ethics - Chemistry 3250 Introduction to Ethics Marc R....

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Chemistry 3250 Introduction to Ethics Marc R. Roussel Note: This lecture was heavily influenced by Jeffrey Kovac, The Ethical Chemist (Pearson, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2004).
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Ethics as a practical matter I Ethical decisions come up all the time in professional life. I Decisions regarding the careers of subordinates/students I Decisions involving the disclosure (or not) of information I Decisions regarding acceptable risk to yourself or to others I One way or another, you’re going to make ethical decisions. I Ideally, you would apply a calm, rational process to situations that are often anything but calm and rational.
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How do you decide what is right? I There is a common pool of very basic values that most of us hold. I These values sometimes conflict, but even when they don’t, the common core only covers certain clear cases, as Gass calls them. I It’s useful to have a couple of things to help us find our way through ethical decisions: I A process for working our way through ethical problems I A set of principles we apply to resolve these problems
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Ethical principles and ethical theories I Ethical principles can come from two sources: I Innate or strongly ingrained principles widely shared within a society I Ethical systems or theories that provide overarching principles I Ethical theories attempt to convert ethical questions into logical questions by providing principles from which ethically correct behavior can be deduced. I Ethical theories are limited and, pushed to their limits, can often generate results that run contrary to most people’s sense of what is right. I Knowing several ethical theories can however help us phrase questions which will allow us to see our way through an ethical problem.
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Utilitarianism Greatest happiness principle: “actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness; wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.” (J. S. Mill,
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course CHEM 3250 taught by Professor Roussel during the Fall '06 term at Lethbridge College.

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ethics - Chemistry 3250 Introduction to Ethics Marc R....

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