1A_exercise_key_3 - 1 Chapter 3 Exercise Key Chapter 3...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 3 Exercise Key 1 Copyright 2004 Mark Bishop Chapter 3 Exercise Key Exercise 3.1 – Classifying Compounds: Classify each of the following substances as either a molecular compound or an ionic compound. a. formaldehyde, CH 2 O (used in embalming fluids) all nonmetal atoms - molecular b. magnesium chloride, MgCl 2 (used in fireproofing wood and in paper manufacturing) metal-nonmetal - ionic Exercise 3.2 – Electronegativities and Bond Type: Classify the following bonds as nonpolar covalent, polar covalent, or ionic. If a bond is polar covalent, identify which atom has the partial negative charge and which has the partial positive charge. If a bond is ionic, identify which atom has the negative charge and which has the positive charge. a. N bonded to H polar covalent N is partial negative and H is partial positive. b. N bonded to Cl nonpolar covalent c. Ca bonded to O ionic O is negative, and Ca is positive. d. P bonded to F polar covalent F is partial negative and P is partial positive. Exercise 3.3 – Electronegativities and Bond Polarity: Which bond would you expect to be more polar, P Cl or P–F ? Exercise 3.4 - Drawing Lewis Structures from Formulas: Draw a Lewis structure for each of the following formulas: a. nitrogen triiodide, NI 3 (explodes at the slightest touch) Nitrogen atoms usually have 3 covalent bonds and 1 lone pair, and iodine atoms usually have 1 covalent bond and 3 lone pairs.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 3 Exercise Key 2 Copyright 2004 Mark Bishop b. hexachloroethane, C 2 Cl 6 (used to make explosives) Carbon atoms usually have 4 covalent bonds and no lone pairs, and chlorine atoms usually have 1 covalent bond and 3 lone pairs. c. hydrogen peroxide, H 2 O 2 (a common antiseptic) Hydrogen atoms always have 1 covalent bond and no lone pairs, and oxygen atoms usually have 2 covalent bonds and 2 lone pairs. d. ethylene (or ethene), C 2 H 4 (used to make polyethylene) Carbon atoms form 4 bonds with no lone pairs, and hydrogen atoms form 1 bond with no lone pairs. To achieve these bonding patterns, there must be a double bond between the carbon atoms. Exercise 3.5 - Naming Binary Covalent Compounds: Write names that correspond to the following formulas: a. P 2 O 5 diphosphorus pentoxide b. PCl 3 phosphorus trichloride c. CO carbon monoxide d. H 2 S dihydrogen monosulfide or hydrogen sulfide e. NH 3 ammonia Exercise 3.6 - Writing Formulas for Binary Covalent Compounds: Write formulas
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course CHEM 100 taught by Professor Mark during the Fall '06 term at Monterey Peninsula College.

Page1 / 8

1A_exercise_key_3 - 1 Chapter 3 Exercise Key Chapter 3...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online