Bishop_Study_Guide_9 - 117 Chapter 9 Chemical Calculations...

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117 Chapter 9 Chemical Calculations and Chemical Formulas Review Skills 9.1 A Typical Problem 9.2 Relating Mass to Number of Particles Atomic Mass and Counting Atoms by Weighing Molar Mass 9.3 Molar Mass and Chemical Compounds Molecular Mass and Molar Mass of Molecular Compounds Ionic Compounds, Formula Units, and Formula Mass Internet: Molar Mass Conversion Factors 9.4 Relationships Between Masses of Elements and Compounds Internet: Percentage of an Element in a Compound 9.5 Determination of Empirical and Molecular Formulas Determining Empirical Formulas Converting Empirical Formulas Into Molecular Formulas Special Topic 9.1: Green Chemistry - Making Chemicals from Safer Reactants Internet: Combustion Analysis Special Topic 9.2: Safe and Effective? Chapter Glossary Internet: Glossary Quiz Chapter Objectives Review Questions Key Ideas Chapter Problems Section Goals and Introductions Section 9.1 A Typical Problem Goal: To introduce the chapter by describing a typical problem that you will be able to work after studying the chapter. Sometimes a task becomes much easier if you know from the beginning where you are going to end up. It will help you to understand the importance of Sections 9.2 and 9.3 if you first know how the calculations described there can be used. This section shows a typical problem and gives you a sense of why it is important.
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118 Study Guide for An Introduction to Chemistry Section 9.2 Relating Mass to Number of Particles Goals To show how to do a procedure called counting by weighing. To introduce atomic mass and show how it can be used to convert between the mass of a sample of an element and the number of atoms that the sample contains. Even a tiny sample of an element contains a huge number of atoms. There’s no way that you could ever count that high, even if you were able to count atoms one at a time (which you can’t). So if you want to know the number of atoms in a sample of an element, you have to do it by an indirect technique called counting by weighing . This section introduces this technique and shows how it can be applied to the conversions between mass of a sample of an element and the number of atoms in the sample. An important unit called the mole is introduced in this section. It is very important that you understand what it is and how it is used. Section 9.3 Molar Mass and Chemical Compounds Goal: To introduce molecular mass and formula mass and show how they can be used to convert between the mass of a sample of a compound and the number of molecules or formula units that the sample contains. This section shows how to calculate the number of molecules (expressed in moles) in a sample of a molecular compound from the mass of that sample and how to calculate the mass in a sample of a molecular compound from the moles of molecules it contains. The section also explains why ionic compounds do not contain molecules and how the term formula unit
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course CHEM 100 taught by Professor Mark during the Fall '06 term at Monterey Peninsula College.

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Bishop_Study_Guide_9 - 117 Chapter 9 Chemical Calculations...

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