Bishop_Study_Guide_10 - 137 Chapter 10 Chemical...

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137 Chapter 10 Chemical Calculations and Chemical Equations Review Skills 10.1 Equation Stoichiometry Internet: Equation Stoichiometry Problems with Mixtures 10.2 Real-World Applications of Equation Stoichiometry Limiting Reactants Percent Yield Special Topic 10.1: Big Problems Require Bold Solutions - Global Warming and Limiting Reactants 10.3 Molarity and Equation Stoichiometry Reactions in Solution and Molarity Equation Stoichiometry and Reactions in Solution Internet: Acid-Base Titrations Chapter Glossary Internet: Glossary Quiz Chapter Objectives Review Questions Key Ideas Chapter Problems Section Goals and Introductions Section 10.1 Equation Stoichiometry Goal: To show how the coefficients in a balanced chemical equation can be used to convert from mass of one substance in a given chemical reaction to the corresponding mass of another substance participating in the same reaction. It’s common that chemists and chemistry students are asked to convert from an amount of one substance in a given chemical reaction to the corresponding amount of another substance participating in the same reaction. This type of calculation, which uses the coefficients in a balanced equation to convert from moles of one substance to moles of another, is called equation
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138 Study Guide for An Introduction to Chemistry stoichiometry. This section shows how to do equation stoichiometry problems for which you are asked to convert from mass of one substance in a given chemical reaction to the corresponding mass of another substance participating in the same reaction. For a related section, see Equation Stoichiometry Problems with Mixtures on our Web site. Internet: Equation Stoichiometry Problems with Mixtures Section 10.2 Real-World Applications of Equation Stoichiometry Goals To explain why chemists sometimes deliberately use a limited amount of one reactant (called the limiting reactant) and excessive amounts of others. To show how to determine which reactant in a chemical reaction is the limiting reactant. To show how to calculate the maximum amount of product that they can form from given amounts of two or more reactants in a chemical reaction. To explain why the actual yield in a reaction might be less than the maximum possible yield (called the theoretical yield). To explain what percent yield is and to show how to calculate the percent yield given the actual yield and enough information to determine the theoretical yield. Chemistry in the real world is sometimes more complicated than we make it seem in introductory chemistry texts. You will see in this section that reactions run in real laboratories never have exactly the right amounts of reactants for each to react completely, and even if they did, it is unlikely that all of the reactants would form the desired products. This section shows you why this is true and shows you how to do calculations that reflect these realities.
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Bishop_Study_Guide_10 - 137 Chapter 10 Chemical...

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