FID - The Flame Ionization Detector Introduction The flame...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Flame Ionization Detector Introduction The flame ionization detector (FID) is the most sensitive gas chromatographic detector for hydrocar- bons such as butane or hexane. With a linear range for 6 or 7 orders of magnitude (106 to 107) and limits of detection in the low picogram or femtogram range, the FID is the gas chromatographic detector for volatile hydrocarbons and many carbon containing compounds. Limitations Molecules that contained only carbon and hydrogen respond best in this detector but the presence of "heteroatoms" in a molecule, such as oxygen, decreases the detector's response. For instance, the FID's methane response (CH4) is fabulous but formaldehyde's (CH2O) is quite poor. Therefore, highly oxygenated molecules or sulfides might best be detected using another detector instead of the FID. Sulfides determination by the flame photometric detector and aldehydes and ketones analyzed with the photoionization detector are alternatives to the use of the FID for those molecules. Detector Construction
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course CHEM 100 taught by Professor Chasteen during the Fall '06 term at Sam Houston State University.

Page1 / 2

FID - The Flame Ionization Detector Introduction The flame...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online