ICP - An animation describing the double dispersion...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: An animation describing the double dispersion inductively couple plasma spectrometer is detailed here www.shsu.edu/%7Echm_tgc/sounds/ICPwCCD.mov . Unlike atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), the power of inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP) lies in its ability to simultaneously disperse and detect many of the emission lines from the elements in the sample. Earlier versions of this instrument used a grating and multiple photomultiplier tubes arranged in the so-called Rowland Circle. An animation displaying a version of this design is available at www.shsu.edu/%7Echm_tgc/sounds/ICPwRC.mov . Most modern ICPs used a combination of two dispersion devices to separate sample emission from the plasma. In the design shown here a grating and a prism disperse light into a two dimensional image that is focused onto the detector, a charged couple device (CCD). In the example here I'm showing this instrument running in a single element mode . Although only a single element is emitting in the plasma, it contains multiple lines and the wavelengths of those emissions are shown in the image in the...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course CHEM 100 taught by Professor Chasteen during the Fall '06 term at Sam Houston State University.

Page1 / 3

ICP - An animation describing the double dispersion...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online