XAS - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Thomas G. Chasteen...

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Unformatted text preview: X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Thomas G. Chasteen Department of Chemistry Sam Houston State University The major parts of this instrument are an X-ray source, a sample holder, an X-ray monochromator, and a detector. A common X-ray source generates X-rays by bombarding a heavy metal target with high energy electrons. The choice of heavy metal controls the range of energy of the emitted X-rays. For instance, a tungsten (W) target produces higher energy X-rays than a silver (Ag) target. Most of the energy that powers this bombarding process is lost as heat so the target electrode needs to be cooled. More modern sources are more efficient and other X-ray sources, like synchrotron beam line at Stanford. The X-ray sources purpose is to supply X-ray radiation to the sample so that (in this description) either X-ray absorption or fluorescence experiments can be carried out. In X-ray absorbance, sample atoms absorb X-rays from the source and the wavelength of the absorbed X-ray (usually recorded as the X-rays energy) and the intensity of that absorbance provide the identity of that...
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XAS - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Thomas G. Chasteen...

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