8 - CHI 221, Fall 2011 Making China modern (9/27) 1.The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHI 221, Fall 2011 Making China modern (9/27)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1.The boundaries of China today are based largely on _____ borders as established in the Qianlong reign. 1) the Yuan 2) the Ming 3) the Qing 4) None of the above. 2
Background image of page 2
The Hundred Day’s Reform (late Qing) Kong Youwei : a Confucian scholar, a strong believer in constitutional monarchy, and wanted to remodel China after Meiji Japan - one of the first advocates of Western communism in China - regarded capitalism as an inherently evil system and believed that government should establish socialist institutions to overlook the welfare of each individual 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
- His work is permeated with the Confucian ideal of ren ( , or humanity) . - belief in bettering humanity with technology - desire to end the traditional Chinese family structure, an early advocate of women's independence in China , believing in equality between men and women and believing that there should be no social barrier barring women from doing whatever men can. 4
Background image of page 4
Failed: top-down, did not encourage private enterprises, competition, no military support 5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Republic of China (1912 – 1949) • January 1, 1912: the presidency was given to Yuan Shikai , a former Qing general. • Warlord Era: 1916-1927: Whoever controlled Beijing was recognized as the “president of the republic” Feng Yuxing Zhang Zuoling Yan Xishan The May Fourth Movement (1919) • the Versailles peace treaty 6
Background image of page 6
2. In the May Fourth Movement, intellectuals and alike all blamed China’s weakness on two things: 1) the conservative Confucian culture & the corruptive officials 2) the corruptive officials & the weakness of the government 3) the foreign imperialism & the conservative Confucian culture 4) under-developed technology & the foreign imperialism 7
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The May Fourth Movement (1915-25): • “21 Demands” – Japan’s control of the Chinese government the Versailles peace treaty – German-held concessions handed over to Japan 8
Background image of page 8
9 May Fourth as the New Culture Movement ( 新文化运动 ) Chinese Renaissance (Hu Shi) -vernacular movement Chinese Enlightenment (Vera Schwarcz) -science and rationalism Chinese Romantic Era (Leo Ou-fan Lee) -individualism and subjectivity 9
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lu Xun 鲁迅 (1881-1936) (Penname of Zhou Shuren) as Representative May Fourth Writer –almost universally recognized as the greatest writer of the May Fourth period –often called the “father” of modern Chinese literature –China's Dickens and Joyce rolled into one. 10
Background image of page 10
11 Early life (1881-1898) educated in a traditional manner grandfather’s arrest on corruption charges father’s death Three Flavors Studio, the local clan school Lu Xun attended
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
12 “For more than four years I used to go, almost daily, to a pawnbroker’s and to a medicine shop. I cannot remember how old I was then, but the counter in the medicine shop was the same height as I, and that in the pawnbroker’s twice my height. I used to hand clothes and trinkets up to the counter twice my height, take the money proffered with contempt, then go to the counter the same height as I to buy medicine for my father, who had long been ill. On my return home I had other things to keep me busy,
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 43

8 - CHI 221, Fall 2011 Making China modern (9/27) 1.The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online