Cressey - Theorist Paper Donald Cressey Michael Capote CCJ...

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Theorist Paper: Donald Cressey Michael Capote CCJ 5606 Dr. Cecil Greek School of Criminology and Criminal Justice Florida State University Hecht House 634 West Call Street Tallahassee, FL 32306-1127 850-644-4050 (Phone) 850-644-9614 (Fax) Draft #1: March 17, 2004
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Introduction Donald Cressey was a central figure in twentieth-century criminology. He was a sociologist, educator, editor, and author. He spoke Norwegian and French, and read German, French, and Scandinavian languages (Who's Who in America,1986). Cressey was undoubtedly one of Sutherland’s brightest students at Indiana University during the 1940s. While working on his PhD in Criminology, he decided his dissertation would concentrate on embezzlers. His contributions to the sociology of crime & delinquency came from his teaching, scholarship, & involvement in criminal justice policy (International Authors and Writers Who's Who,1982). Accordingly, he was best known for his landmark study on embezzlement as well as for carrying Edwin Sutherland's Principles of Criminology (Sutherland, 1966) textbook through many revised editions. Cressey himself authored 13 books and nearly 300 articles on criminology matters by the time of his death in 1987. Given the importance and impact of his life’s work it is valuable to place it within its larger social, historical and political context—this in an effort to understand why it had such an influence on society and academia. Developments from within the field of Sociology indisputably had a significant impact on the work of Donald Cressey (Ohlin, 1988). First and foremost was the influence of Edwin H. Sutherland. Dr. Sutherland, a criminologist at Indiana University, was particularly interested in the type of fraud committed by elite business executives, either against stock holders or the public. Sutherland, who coined the term ‘white-collar crime’ (Sutherland, 1966) in 1939, is to the world of white collar criminality what Freud is to psychology. He was to Cressey a mentor, friend, and co-author (Wilson, 1970). These influences coupled with times when the “social science view” of crime was thought by many to assert that crime was the result of poverty, racial discrimination, and other privations. The consensus was that the only morally defensible and substantively efficacious strategy for reducing crime was to attack its “root causes” with programs that ended poverty, reduced discrimination, and meliorated privation (Wilson, 1975). This was certainly, at least in part, the view of President Johnson’s Commission on Crime and Administration of Justice’s report, The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society (President’s
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Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, 1967) and that of the former attorney General Ramsey Clark as expressed in his book titled Crime in America , (Clark, 1970) where both seemed to draw heavily on social science theories and findings. In fact, when the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course ACCOUNTING 341 taught by Professor Kamradt during the Spring '10 term at Franklin.

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Cressey - Theorist Paper Donald Cressey Michael Capote CCJ...

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