pdes - Chapter 11 Partial Differential Equations A wide...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 11 Partial Differential Equations A wide variety of partial differential equations occurs in technical computing. We cannot begin to cover them all in this book. In this chapter, we limit ourselves to three model problems for second-order partial differential equations in one or two space dimensions. 11.1 Model Problems = 2 x2 All the problems we consider involve the Laplacian operator, which is in one space dimension and = 2 2 + 2 2 x y in two space dimensions. We let denote the single variable x in one dimension x and the pair of variables (x, y) in two dimensions. The first model problem is the Poisson equation. This elliptic equation does not involve a time variable, and so describes the steady state, quiescent behavior of a model variable: u = f ( ). x There are no initial conditions. The second model problem is the heat equation. This parabolic equation occurs in models involving diffusion and decay: u = u - f ( ). x t The initial condition is February 15, 2008 u( , 0) = u0 ( ). x x 1 2 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations The third model problem is the wave equation. This hyperbolic equation describes how a disturbance travels through matter. If the units are chosen so that the wave propagation speed is equal to one, the amplitude of a wave satisfies 2u = u. t2 Typical initial conditions specify the initial amplitude and take the initial velocity to be zero: u u( , 0) = u0 ( ), x x ( , 0) = 0. x t In one dimension, all the problems take place on a finite interval on the x-axis. In more than one space dimension, geometry plays a vital role. In two dimensions, all the problems take place in a bounded region in the (x, y) plane. In all cases, f ( ) x and u0 ( ) are given functions of . All the problems involve boundary conditions x x where the value of u or some partial derivative of u is specified on the boundary of . Unless otherwise specified, we will take the boundary values to be zero. 11.2 Finite Difference Methods Basic finite difference methods for approximating solutions to these problems use a uniform mesh with spacing h. In one dimension, for the interval a x b, the spacing is h = (b - a)/(m + 1) and the mesh points are xi = a + ih, i = 0, . . . , m + 1. The second derivative with respect to x is approximated by the 3-point centered second difference: h u(x) = u(x + h) - 2u(x) + u(x - h) . h2 In two dimensions, the mesh is the set of points (xi , yj ) = (ih, jh) that lie within the region . Approximating the partial derivatives with centered second differences gives the 5-point discrete Laplacian h u(x, y) = u(x + h, y) - 2u(x, y) + u(x - h, y) h2 u(x, y + h) - 2u(x, y) + u(x, y - h) + . h2 Alternative notation uses P = (x, y) for a mesh point and N = (x, y + h), E = (x + h, y), S = (x, y - h), and W = (x - h, y) for its four neighbors in the four compass directions. The discrete Laplacian is h u(P ) = u(N ) + u(W ) + u(E) + u(S) - 4u(P ) . h2 11.2. Finite Difference Methods The finite difference Poisson problem involves finding values of u so that h u( ) = f ( ) x x 3 for each point on the mesh. x If the source term f ( ) is zero, Poisson's equation is called Laplace's equation: x h u(x) = 0. In one dimension, Laplace's equation has only trivial solutions. The value of u at a mesh point x is the average of the values of u at its left and right neighbors, so u(x) must be a linear function of x. Taking the boundary conditions into consideration implies that u(x) is the linear function connecting the two boundary values. If the boundary values are zero, then u(x) is identically zero. In more than one dimension, solutions to Laplace's equation are called harmonic functions and are not simply linear functions of . x The finite difference heat and wave equations also make use of first and second differences in the t direction. Let denote the length of a time step. For the heat equation, we use a difference scheme that corresponds to Euler's method for ordinary differential equations: u( , t + ) - u( , t) x x = h u( ). x Starting with the initial conditions u( , 0) = u0 ( ), we can step from any value of x x t to t + with u( , t + ) = u( , t) + h u( , t) x x x for all of the mesh points in the region. The boundary conditions supply values on x the boundary or outside the region. This method is explicit because each new value of u can be computed directly from values of u at the previous time step. More complicated methods are implicit because they involve the solution of systems of equations at each step. For the wave equation, we can use a centered second difference in t: u( , t + ) - 2u( , t) + u( , t - ) x x x = h u( , t). x 2 This requires two "layers" of values of the solution, one at t - and one at t. In our simple model problem, the initial condition u ( , 0) = 0 x t allows us to start with both u( , 0) = u0 ( ) and u( , ) = u0 ( ). We compute x x x x subsequent layers with u( , t + ) = 2u( , t) - u( , t - ) + 2 h u( , t) x x x x for all of the mesh points in the region. The boundary conditions supply values x on the boundary or outside the region. Like our scheme for the heat equation, this method for solving the wave equation is explicit. 4 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations 11.3 Matrix Representation If a one-dimensional mesh function is represented as a vector, the one-dimensional difference operator h becomes the tridiagonal matrix -2 1 1 -2 1 1 -2 1 1 . .. .. .. 2 h . . . 1 -2 1 1 -2 This matrix is symmetric. (It is also negative definite.) Most importantly, even if there are thousands of interior mesh points, there are at most three nonzero elements in each row and column. Such matrices are the prime examples of sparse matrices. When computing with sparse matrices, it is important to use data structures that store only the locations and values of the nonzero elements. With u represented as a vector and h2 h as a matrix A, the Poisson problem becomes Au = b, where b is a vector (the same size as u) containing the values of h2 f (x) at the interior mesh points. The first and last components of b would also include any nonzero boundary values. In Matlab, the solution to the discrete Poisson problem is computed using sparse backslash, which takes advantage of the sparsity in A: u = A\b The situation for meshes in two dimensions is more complicated. Let's number the interior mesh points in from top to bottom and from left to right. For example, the numbering of an L-shaped region would be L = 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 6 7 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 10 11 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 14 15 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 18 19 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 0 0 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 0 0 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 0 0 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 The zeros are points on the boundary or outside the region. With this numbering, the values of any function defined on the interior of the region can be reshaped into a long column vector. In this example, the length of the vector is 56. 11.3. Matrix Representation 5 If a two-dimensional mesh function is represented as a vector, the finite difference Laplacian becomes a matrix. For example, at point number 43, h2 h u(43) = u(34) + u(42) + u(44) + u(52) - 4u(43). If A is the corresponding matrix, then its 43rd row would have five nonzero elements: a43,34 = a43,42 = a43,44 = a43,52 = 1, and a43,43 = -4. A mesh point near the boundary has only two or three interior neighbors, so the corresponding row of A has only three or four nonzero entries. The complete matrix A has -4's on its diagonal, four 1's off the diagonal in most of its rows, two or three 1's off the diagonal in some of its rows, and zeros elsewhere. For the example region above, A would be 56 by 56. Here is A if there are only 16 interior points. A = -4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 -4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 -4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 -4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 -4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 -4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 -4 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 -4 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 -4 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 -4 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 -4 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 -4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 -4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 -4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 -4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 -4 This matrix is symmetric, negative definite, and sparse. There are at most five nonzero elements in each row and column. Matlab has two functions that involve the discrete Laplacian, del2 and delsq. If u is a two-dimensional array representing a function u(x, y), then del2(u) computes h u, scaled by h2 /4, at interior points, and uses one-sided formulas at points near the boundary. For example, the function u(x, y) = x2 + y 2 has u = 4. The statements h = 1/20; [x,y] = meshgrid(-1:h:1); u = x.^2 + y.^2; d = (4/h^2) * del2(u); produce an array d, the same size as x and y, with all the elements equal to 4. 6 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations If G is a two-dimensional array specifying the numbering of a mesh, then A = -delsq(G) is the matrix representation of the operator h2 h on that mesh. The mesh numbering for several specific regions is generated by numgrid. For example, m = 5 L = numgrid('L',2*m+1) generates the L-shaped mesh with 56 interior points shown above. And m = 3 A = -delsq(numgrid('L',2*m+1)) generates the 16-by-16 matrix A shown above. The function inregion can also generate mesh numberings. For example, the coordinates of the vertices of the L-shaped domain are xv = [0 0 1 yv = [0 -1 -1 The statement [x,y] = meshgrid(-1:h:1); generates a square grid of width h. The statement [in,on] = inregion(x,y,xv,yv); generates arrays of zeros and ones that mark the points that are contained in the domain, including the boundary, as well as those that are strictly on the boundary. The statements p = find(in-on); n = length(p); L = zeros(size(x)); L(p) = 1:n; number the n interior points from top to bottom and left to right. The statement A = -delsq(L); generates the n-by-n sparse matrix representation of the discrete Laplacian on the mesh. With u represented as a vector with n components, the Poisson problem becomes Au = b, where b is a vector (the same size as u) containing the values of h2 f (x, y) at the interior mesh points. The components of b that correspond to mesh points with neighbors on the boundary or outside the region also include any nonzero boundary values. As in one dimension, the solution to the discrete Poisson problem is computed using sparse backslash. u = A\b 1 -1 -1 1 1 0 0]; 0]; 11.4. Numerical Stability 7 11.4 Numerical Stability The time-dependent heat and wave equations generate a sequence of vectors, u(k) , where the k denotes the kth time step. For the heat equation, the recurrence is u(k+1) = u(k) + Au(k) , where = This can be written u(k+1) = M u(k) , where M = I + A. In one dimension, the iteration matrix M has 1 - 2 on the diagonal and one or two 's off the diagonal in each row. In two dimensions, M has 1 - 4 on the diagonal and two, three, or four 's off the diagonal in each row. Most of the row sums in M are equal to 1; a few are less than 1. Each element of u(k+1) is a linear combination of elements of u(k) with coefficients that add up to 1 or less. Now here is the key observation. If the elements of M are nonnegative, then the recurrence is stable. In fact, it is dissipative. Any error or noise in u(k) is not magnified in u(k+1) . But if the diagonal elements of M are negative, then the recurrence can be unstable. Error and noise, including roundoff error and noise in the initial conditions, can be magnified with each time step. Requiring 1 - 2 or 1 - 4 to be positive leads to a very important stability condition for this explicit method for the heat equation. In one dimension, 1 . 2 And, in two dimensions, 1 . 4 If this condition is satisfied, the iteration matrix has positive diagonal elements and the method is stable. Analysis of the wave equation is a little more complicated because it involves three levels, u(k+1) , u(k) , and u(k-1) . The recurrence is u(k+1) = 2u(k) - u(k-1) + Au(k) , where 2 . h2 The diagonal elements of the iteration matrix are now 2 - 2, or 2 - 4. In one dimension, the stability condition is = 1. . h2 8 And, in two dimensions, Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations 1 . 2 These stability conditions are known as the CFL conditions, after Courant, Friedrichs and Lewy, who wrote a paper in 1928 that used finite difference methods to prove existence of solutions to the partial differential equations of mathematical physics. Stability conditions are restrictions on the size of the time step, . Any attempt to speed up the computation by taking larger time steps is likely to be disastrous. For the heat equation, the stability condition is particularly severe--the time step must be smaller than the square of the space mesh width. More sophisticated methods, often involving some implicit equation solving at each step, have less restrictive or unlimited stability conditions. The M-file pdegui illustrates the concepts discussed in this chapter by offering the choice among several domains and among the model partial differential equations. For Poisson's equation, pdegui uses sparse backslash to solve in the chosen domain. For the heat and wave equations, the stability parameter can be varied. If the critical value, 0.25 for the heat equation and 0.50 for the wave equation, is exceeded by even a small amount, the instability rapidly becomes apparent. You will find much more powerful capabilities in the Matlab Partial Differential Equation Toolbox. h u = 1 11.5 The L-Shaped Membrane Separating out periodic time behavior in the wave equation leads to solutions of the form u( , t) = cos ( t) v( ). x x The functions v( ) depend upon . They satisfy x and are zero on the boundary. The quantities that lead to nonzero solutions are the eigenvalues, and the corresponding functions v( ) are the eigenfunctions or x modes. They are determined by the physical properties and the geometry of each particular situation. The square roots of the eigenvalues are resonant frequencies. A periodic external driving force at one of these frequencies generates an unboundedly strong response in the medium. Any solution of the wave equation can be expressed as a linear combination of these eigenfunctions. The coefficients in the linear combination are obtained from the initial conditions. In one dimension, the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are easily determined. The simplest example is a violin string, held fixed at the ends of the interval of length . The eigenfunctions are vk (x) = sin (kx). v + v = 0 11.5. The L-Shaped Membrane 9 The eigenvalues are determined by the boundary condition, vk () = 0. Hence, k must be an integer and k = k 2 . If the initial condition, u0 (x), is expanded in a Fourier sine series, u0 (x) = ak sin (kx), k then the solution to the wave equation is u(x, t) = ak cos (kt) sin (kx) = k k ak cos ( k t) vk (x). In two dimensions, an L-shaped region formed from three unit squares is interesting for several reasons. It is one of the simplest geometries for which solutions to the wave equation cannot be expressed analytically, so numerical computation is necessary. Furthermore, the 270 nonconvex corner causes a singularity in the solution. Mathematically, the gradient of the first eigenfunction is unbounded near the corner. Physically, a membrane stretched over such a region would rip at the corner. This singularity limits the accuracy of finite difference methods with uniform grids. The MathWorks has adopted a surface plot of the first eigenfunction of the L-shaped region as the company logo. The computation of this eigenfunction involves several of the numerical techniques we have described in this book. Simple model problems involving waves on an L-shaped region include an L-shaped membrane, or L-shaped tambourine, and a beach towel blowing in the wind, constrained by a picnic basket on one fourth of the towel. A more practical example involves ridged microwave waveguides. One such device, shown in Figure 11.1, is a waveguide-to-coax adapter. The active region is the channel with the H-shaped cross section visible at the end of the adapter. The ridges increase the bandwidth of the guide at the expense of higher attenuation and lower powerhandling capability. Symmetry of the H about the dotted lines shown in the contour plot of the electric field implies that only one quarter of the domain needs to be considered and that the resulting geometry is our L-shaped region. The boundary conditions are different than our membrane problem, but the differential equation and the solution techniques are the same. Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the L-shaped domain can be computed by finite difference methods. The Matlab statements m = 200 h = 1/m A = delsq(numgrid('L',2*m+1))/h^2 set up the 5-point finite difference approximation to the Laplacian on an 200-by-200 mesh in each of the three squares that make up the domain. The resulting sparse matrix A has order 119201 and 594409 nonzero entries. The statement 10 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations Figure 11.1. A double-ridge microwave-to-coax adapter and its H-shaped region. Photo courtesy Advanced Technical Materials, Inc. [1]. lambda = eigs(A,6,0) uses Arnoldi's method from the Matlab implementation of ARPACK to compute the first six eigenvalues. It takes less than 2 min on a 1.4 GHz Pentium laptop to produce lambda = 9.64147 15.19694 19.73880 29.52033 31.91583 41.47510 The exact values are 9.63972 15.19725 19.73921 29.52148 31.91264 41.47451 You can see that even with this fine mesh and large matrix calculation, the computed eigenvalues are accurate to only three or four significant digits. If you try to get more accuracy by using a finer mesh and hence a larger matrix, the computation requires so much memory that the total execution time is excessive. For the L-shaped domain and similar problems, a technique using analytic solutions to the underlying differential equation is much more efficient and accurate than finite difference methods. The technique involves polar coordinates and 11.5. The L-Shaped Membrane fractional-order Bessel functions. With parameters and , the functions v(r, ) = J ( r) sin ( ) are exact solutions to the polar coordinate version of the eigenfunction equation 2 v 1 v 1 2v + + 2 2 + v = 0. r2 r r r For any value of , the functions v(r, ) satisfy the boundary conditions v(r, 0) = 0 and v(r, /) = 0 11 on the two straight edges of a circular sector with angle /. If is chosen to be a zero of the Bessel function, J ( ) = 0, then v(r, ) is also zero on the circle, r = 1. Figure 11.2 shows a few of the eigenfunctions of the circular sector with angle 3/2. The eigenfunctions have been chosen to illustrate symmetry about 3/4 and /2. 8.9494 14.3559 20.7146 33.4927 44.0711 55.6455 Figure 11.2. Eigenfunctions of the three-quarter disc. We approximate the eigenfunctions of the L-shaped domain and other regions with corners by linear combinations of the circular sector solutions: v(r, ) = cj Jj ( r) sin (j ). j The angle of the reentrant 270 corner in the L-shaped region is 3/2, or /(2/3), so the values of are integer multiples of 2/3: j = 2j . 3 These functions v(r, ) are exact solutions to the eigenfunction differential equation. There is no finite difference mesh involved. The functions also satisfy the boundary 12 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations conditions on the two edges that meet at the reentrant corner. All that remains is to pick the parameter and the coefficients cj so that the boundary conditions on the remaining edges are satisfied. A least squares approach involving the SVD is used to determine and the cj . Pick m points, (ri , i ), on the remaining edges of the boundary. Let n be the number of fundamental solutions to be used. Generate an m-by-n matrix A with elements that depend upon : Ai,j () = Jj ( ri ) sin (j i ), i = 1, . . . , m, j = 1, . . . , n. Then, for any vector c, the vector Ac is the vector of boundary values, v(ri , i ). We want to make ||Ac|| small without taking ||c|| small. The SVD provides the solution. Let n (A()) denote the smallest singular value of the matrix A(). and let k denote a value of that produces a local minimum of the smallest singular value: k = kth minimizer(n (A())). Each k approximates an eigenvalue of the region. The corresponding right singular vector provides the coefficients for the linear combination c = V(:,n). 9.6397 15.1973 19.7392 31.9126 44.9485 49.3480 Figure 11.3. Eigenfunctions of the L-shaped region. It is worthwhile to take advantage of symmetries. It turns out that the eigenfunctions fall into three symmetry classes: symmetric about the center line at = 3/4, so v(r, ) = v(r, 3/2 - ); antisymmetric about the center line at = 3/4, so v(r, ) = -v(r, 3/2 - ); eigenfunction of the square, so v(r, /2) = 0 and v(r, ) = 0. These symmetries allow us to restrict the values of j used in each expansion: Exercises j = j = j = 2j 3 , 2j 3 , 2j 3 , 13 j odd and not a multiple of 3; j even and not a multiple of 3; j a multiple of 3. The M-file membranetx in the NCM directory computes eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the L-membrane using these symmetries and a search for local minima of n (A()). The M-file membrane, distributed with Matlab in the demos directory, uses an older version of the algorithm based on the QR decomposition instead of the SVD. Figure 11.3 shows six eigenfunctions of the L-shaped region, with two from each of the three symmetry classes. They can be compared with the eigenfunctions of the sector shown in Figure 11.2. By taking the radius of the sector to be 2/ , both regions have the same area and the eigenvalues are comparable. The demo M-file logo makes a surf plot of the first eigenfunction, then adds lighting and shading to create The MathWorks logo. After being so careful to satisfy the boundary conditions, the logo uses only the first two terms in the circular sector expansion. This artistic license gives the edge of the logo a more interesting curved shape. Exercises 11.1. Let n be an integer and generate n-by-n matrices A, D, and I with the statements e I D A = = = = ones(n,1); spdiags(e,0,n,n); spdiags([-e e],[0 1],n,n); spdiags([e -2*e e],[-1 0 1],n,n); (a) For an appropriate value of h, the matrix (1/h2 )A approximates h for the interval 0 x 1. Is that value of h equal to 1/(n-1), 1/n, or 1/(n+1)? (b) What does (1/h)D approximate? (c) What are DT D and DDT ? (d) What is A2 ? (e) What is kron(A,I)+kron(I,A)? (f) Describe the output produced by plot(inv(full(-A))). 11.2. (a) Use finite differences to compute a numerical approximation to the solution u(x) to the one-dimensional Poisson problem d2 u = exp (-x2 ) dx2 on the interval -1 x 1. The boundary conditions are u(-1) = 0 and u(1) = 0. Plot your solution. (b) If you have access to dsolve in the Symbolic Toolbox, or if you are very good at calculus, find the analytic solution of the same problem and compare it with your numerical approximation. 14 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations 11.3. Reproduce the contour plot in Figure 11.1 of the first eigenfunction of the H-shaped ridge waveguide formed from four L-shaped regions. 11.4. Let h(x) be the function defined by the M-file humps(x). Solve four different problems involving h(x) on the interval 0 x 1. (a) One-dimensional Poisson problem with humps as the source term: d2 u = -h(x), dx2 with boundary conditions u(0) = 0, u(1) = 0. Make plots, similar to Figure 11.4, of h(x) and u(x). Compare diff(u,2) with humps(x). 100 80 60 40 20 0 0 0.5 1 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 0 0.5 1 Figure 11.4. h(x) and u(x). (b) One-dimensional heat equation with humps as the source term: u 2u = + h(x), t x2 with initial value and boundary conditions u(0, t) = 0, u(1, t) = 0. Create an animated plot of the solution as a function of time. What is the limit as t of u(x, t)? (c) One-dimensional heat equation with humps as the initial value: u 2u = , t x2 with initial value u(x, 0) = h(x) u(0, x) = 0 Exercises and boundary conditions u(0, t) = h(0), u(1, t) = h(1). 15 Create an animated plot of the solution as a function of time. What is the limit as t of u(x, t)? (d) One-dimensional wave equation with humps as the initial value: 2u 2u = , t2 x2 with initial values u(x, 0) = h(x), u (x, 0) = 0, t and boundary conditions u(0, t) = h(0), u(1, t) = h(1). Create an animated plot of the solution as a function of time. For what values of t does u(x, t) return to its initial value h(x)? 11.5. Let p(x, y) be the function defined by the M-file peaks(x,y). Solve four different problems involving p(x, y) on the square -3 x 3, -3 y 3. 2 2 0 0 -2 -2 0 2 -2 -2 0 2 Figure 11.5. p(x, y) and u(x, y). (a) Two-dimensional Poisson problem with peaks as the source term: 2u 2u + 2 = p(x, y), x2 y with boundary conditions u(x, y) = 0 if |x| = 3 or |y| = 3. Make contour plots, similar to Figure 11.5, of p(x, y) and u(x, y). 16 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations (b) Two-dimensional heat equation with peaks as the source term: u 2u 2u = + 2 - p(x, y), t x2 y with initial value and boundary conditions u(x, y, t) = 0 if |x| = 3 or |y| = 3. Create an animated contour plot of the solution as a function of time. What is the limit as t of u(x, t)? (c) Two-dimensional heat equation with peaks as the initial value: u 2u = , t x2 with initial value and boundary conditions u(x, y, t) = p(x, y) if |x| = 3 or |y| = 3. Create an animated contour plot of the solution as a function of time. What is the limit as t of u(x, t)? (d) Two-dimensional wave equation with peaks as the initial value: 2u 2u = , t2 x2 with initial values u(x, y, 0) = p(x, y), u (x, y, 0) = 0 t and boundary conditions u(x, y, t) = p(x, y) if |x| = 3 or |y| = 3. u(x, y, 0) = p(x, y) u(x, y, 0) = 0 Create an animated contour plot of the solution as a function of time. Does the limit as t of u(x, t) exist? 11.6. The method of lines is a convenient technique for solving time-dependent partial differential equations. Replace all the spatial derivatives with finite differences, but leave the time derivatives intact. Then use a stiff ordinary differential equation solver on the resulting system. In effect, this is an implicit time-stepping finite difference algorithm with the time step determined Exercises 17 automatically and adaptively by the ODE solver. For our model heat and wave equations, the ODE systems are simply u = (1/h2 )Au and u = (1/h2 )Au. The matrix (1/h2 )A represents h , and u is the vector-valued function of t formed from all the elements u(xi , t) or u(xi , yj , t) at the mesh points. (a) The Matlab function pdepe implements the method of lines in a general setting. Investigate its use for our one- and two-dimensional model heat equations. (b) If you have access to the Partial Differential Equation Toolbox, investigate its use for our two-dimensional model heat and wave equations. (c) Implement your own method of lines solutions for our model equations. 11.7. Answer the following questions about pdegui. (a) How does the number of points n in the grid depend upon the grid size h for the various regions? (b) How does the time step for the heat equation and for the wave equation depend upon the grid size h? (c) Why are the contour plots of the solution to the Poisson problem and the eigenvalue problem with index = 1 similar? (d) How do the contour plots produced by pdegui of the eigenfunctions of the L-shaped domain compare with those produced by contourf(membranetx(index)) (e) Why are the regions Drum1 and Drum2 interesting? Search the Web for "isospectral" and "Can you hear the shape of a drum?" You should find many articles and papers, including ones by Gordon, Webb, and Wolpert [3] and Driscoll [2]. 11.8. Add the outline of your hand that you obtained in exercise 3.4 as another region to pdegui. Figure 11.6 shows one of the eigenfunctions of my hand. 11.9. The electrostatic capacity of a region is the quantity u(x, y)dxdy, where u(x, y) is the solution to the Poisson problem u = -1 in and u(x, y) = 0 on the boundary of . (a) What is the capacity of the unit square? (b) What is the capacity of the L-shaped domain? (c) What is the capacity of your hand? 18 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations Figure 11.6. An eigenfunction of a hand. 11.10. The statements load penny P = flipud(P) contour(P,1:12:255) colormap(copper) axis square access a file in the Matlab demos directory and produce Figure 11.7. The data were obtained in 1984 at what was then the National Bureau of Standards by an instrument that makes precise measurements of the depth of a mold used to mint the U.S. one cent coin. Figure 11.7. The depth of a mold used to mint the U.S. one cent coin. The NCM function pennymelt uses this penny data as the initial condition, u(x, y, 0), for the heat equation and produces an animated, evolving plot of the solution, u(x, y, t). You can choose either a lighted, surface plot or Exercises 19 a contour plot. You can choose the time step with uicontrols or with pennymelt(delta). You can also choose a time-stepping algorithm know as the ADI or alternating direction implicit method. Each time step involves two half-steps, one implicit in the x direction and the other implicit in the y direction. -u(k+1/2) (N ) + (1 + 2)u(k+1/2) (P ) - u(k+1/2) (S) = u(k) (E) + (1 - 2)u(k) (P ) + u(k) (W ), (k+1) -u (E) + (1 + 2)u(k+1) (P ) - u(k+1) (W ) = u(k+1/2) (N ) + (1 - 2)u(k+1/2) (P ) + u(k+1/2) (S). Solving these implicit equations on an m-by-n grid requires the solution of m tridiagonal systems of order n for the first half-step and then n tridiagonal systems of order m for the second half-step. Answer these questions about pennymelt. (a) What is the limiting behavior of u(x, y, t) as t ? (b) For what values of is the explicit time-stepping algorithm stable? (c) Demonstrate that the ADI method is stable for any value of . 11.11. Let p(x, y) be the function defined on a 128-by-128 square by the penny data described in the previous exercise. (a) Make a contour plot of p(x, y) and make a lighted surface plot using the section of code in pennymelt.m. (b) Solve the discrete Poisson problem h u = p with u(x, y) = 0 outside the square, and plot the solution u(x, y). (c) Use del2 to compute f = h u, and compare f (x, y) with p(x, y). 11.12. Modify pennymelt.m to solve the wave equation instead of the heat equation. 11.13. Modify waves.m to use nine eigenfunctions instead of four. 11.14. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the unit square are m,n = (m2 + n2 ) 2 , um,n = sin mx sin ny. If the m,n are indexed with one subscript and listed in increasing order, we have k = (2, 5, 5, 8, 10, 10, 13, 13, 17, 17, 18, 20, 20, . . .) 2 . We see that 1 , 4 , and 11 are simple eigenvalues, but that most of the eigenvalues are double. (a) What is the smallest triple eigenvalue of the unit square and what is its index? In other words, what is the smallest integer that can be written as the sum of two squares in three different ways? (b) What is the smallest quadruple eigenvalue of the unit square? 20 Chapter 11. Partial Differential Equations 11.15. By reflecting the eigenfunctions of the unit square twice, we obtain some of the eigenfunctions of the L-shaped domain. The indexing is different because the L also has eigenfunctions that are not derived from the square. For example, 3 of the L is 2 2 because it is equal to 1 of the square. And 8 = 9 of the L is a double eigenvalue, 5 2 , corresponding to 2 = 3 of the square. (a) Roughly what fraction of the eigenvalues of the L-shaped region are also eigenvalues of the square? (b) What is the smallest triple eigenvalue of the L-shaped region and what is its index? (c) What is the smallest quadruple eigenvalue of the L-shaped region? (d) Neither membranetx nor pdegui uses the sin mx sin ny representation of eigenfunctions of the square. This is OK because these eigenfunctions are not unique and can have other representations. How do membranetx and pdegui compute eigenfunctions? How do they get a set of linearly independent eigenfunctions for eigenvalues with multiplicity greater than one? 11.16. Enter the commands ncmlogo cameratoolbar Or, just enter the command ncmlogo and then select Camera Toolbar from the View tab on the figure window. Experiment with the various icons available on the new toolbar. What do they all do? 11.17. Make your own copy of ncmlogo and modify it to create a logo for your own book or company. Bibliography [1] Advanced Technical Materials, Inc. http://www.atmmicrowave.com [2] T. A. Driscoll, Eigenmodes of isospectral drums, SIAM Review, 39 (1997), pp. 117. http://www.math.udel.edu/~driscoll/pubs/drums.pdf [3] C. Gordon, D. Webb, and S. Wolpert, Isospectral plane domains and surfaces via Riemannian orbifolds, Inventiones Mathematicae, 110 (1992), pp. 122. 21 ...
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