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9781111640125_IM_ch02

Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals

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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Fourth Edition 2-1 Chapter 2 Malware and Social Engineering Attacks At a Glance Instructor’s Manual Table of Contents Overview Objectives Teaching Tips Quick Quizzes Class Discussion Topics Additional Projects Additional Resources Key Terms
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Fourth Edition 2-2 Lecture Notes Overview In this chapter, we will examine the threats and risks that a computer system faces today. It begins by looking at software-based attacks. Then, it considers attacks directed against the computer hardware. Finally, the chapter turns to the expanding world of virtualization and how virtualized environments are increasingly becoming the target of attackers. Chapter Objectives Describe the differences between a virus and a worm List the types of malware that conceals its appearance Identify different kinds of malware that is designed for profit Describe the types of social engineering psychological attacks Explain physical social engineering attacks Teaching Tips Attacks Using Malware 1. Define malicious software, or malware, as software that enters a computer system without the owner’s knowledge or consent. Malware is a general term that refers to a wide variety of damaging or annoying software. 2. Describe the three primary objectives of malware: a. To infect a computer system b. Conceal the malware’s malicious actions c. Bring profit from the actions that it performs Malware That Spreads 1. Define a virus as a program that secretly attaches to another document or program and executes when that document or program is opened. 2. Explain that once a virus infects a computer, it performs two separate tasks: a. Replicates itself by spreading to other computers b. Activates its malicious payload 3. Mention that viruses cause problems ranging from displaying an annoying message to erasing files from a hard drive or causing a computer to crash repeatedly. Use Figure 2- 1 to illustrate your explanation.
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Fourth Edition 2-3 4. Describe the following types of computer viruses: a. File infector virus b. Resident virus c. Boot virus d. Companion virus e. Macro virus 5. Explain that metamorphic viruses avoid detection by altering how they appear. Polymorphic viruses also encrypt their contents differently each time. 6. Define a worm as a program designed to take advantage of a vulnerability in an application or an operating system in order to enter a system. 7. Explain that worms are different from viruses in two regards: a. A worm can travel by itself b. A worm does not require any user action to begin its execution 8. Mention that some actions that worms perform include deleting files on the computer or allowing the computer to be remote-controlled by an attacker.
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