9781111640125_IM_ch13

Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals

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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Fourth Edition 13-1 Chapter 13 Business Continuity At a Glance Instructor’s Manual Table of Contents Overview Objectives Teaching Tips Quick Quizzes Class Discussion Topics Additional Projects Additional Resources Key Terms
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Fourth Edition 13-2 Lecture Notes Overview The availability aspect of the CIA triad generally means keeping data available, but the most important aspect of availability is the availability of data during a crisis. Whether that crisis is natural or man-made, businesses need data to continue to operate. This chapter covers the basics of the planning needed to continue to operate the information infrastructure of a business during a crisis, whether that is a disaster or an incident. Chapter Objectives Define environmental controls Describe the components of redundancy planning List disaster recovery procedures Describe incident response procedures Teaching Tips What Is Business Continuity? 1. Explain that business continuity can be defined as the ability of an organization to maintain its operations and services in the face of a disruptive event. 2. Note that business continuity planning and testing is the process of identifying exposure to threats, creating preventive and recovery procedures, and then testing them to determine if they are sufficient. 3. Discuss the importance of a business impact analysis. 4. Refer to Table 13-1 to talk about the items to cover in a BIA interview. Disaster Recovery 1. Define disaster recovery as the procedures and processes for restoring an organization’s IT operations following a disaster. It generally focuses on restoring computing and technology resources to their former state. 2. Mention that disaster recovery involves creating, implementing, and testing disaster recovery plans.
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Fourth Edition 13-3 Disaster Recovery Plan 1. Define a disaster recovery plan (DRP) as a written document that details the process for restoring IT resources. Comprehensive in its scope, a DRP is intended to be a detailed document that is updated regularly. Use Table 13-2 to illustrate your explanation. 2. Mention that all disaster recovery plans are different. 3. Most disaster recovery plans address the common features included in the following typical outline: a. Unit 1: Purpose and Scope b. Unit 2: Recovery Team c. Unit 3: Preparing for a Disaster d. Unit 4: Emergency Procedures e. Unit 5: Restoration Procedures 4. Mention that it is important that a good DRP contains sufficient detail. Use Figure 13-1 to illustrate your explanation.
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9781111640125_IM_ch13 - Security+ Guide to Network Security...

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