W5-BIO208 - The Science of Nutrition-BIO (208): Week (WA5)...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Science of Nutrition-BIO (208): Week (WA5) The Science of Nutrition (BIO-208): Week (WA5)  Nov 29, 2011 Thomas Edison State College Dr. Stephen Glass
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Science of Nutrition-BIO (208): Week (WA5) A- Discuss ways in which the body's metabolism adapts to conditions of  fasting/starvation.  How do these adaptations affect the rate of weight loss  when dieting?             We take carbohydrates, proteins, fats as well as other bio-molecules in our diet,  for instance, vitamins, minerals etc. All of these components are used by our body for  specific purposes. For instance, if you’re starving, glucose comes mainly from one place,  and that is from the body’s protein reservoir: muscle. A little can come from stored fat,  but not from the fatty acids themselves. Although glucose can be converted to fat, the  reaction can’t go the other way. Fat is stored as a triglyceride, which is three fatty acids  hooked on to a glycerol molecule. The glycerol molecule is a three-carbon structure that,  when freed from the attached fatty acids, can combine with another glycerol molecule to  make glucose. (pp. 207-231) Thus a starving person can get a little glucose from the fat  that is released from the fat cells, but not nearly enough. “Several hours later, however,  most of the glucose is used up—liver glycogen is exhausted and blood glucose begins to  fall. Low blood glucose serves as a signal that promotes further fat breakdown and  release of amino acids from muscles”. (p. 226) At this point most of the body cells are  depending on fatty acids as their source of fuel; fatty acids Glucose is their principal  energy fuel, and even when other energy fuels are available, glucose must be present  with the fatty acids to permit the energy metabolizing machinery of the nervous system  to work.  The Book Understanding Nutrition. (2010), Stated that, as the fast  continues the body finds a way to use its fat to fuel the brain. It  adapts by combining acetyl CoA fragments derived from fatty acids 
Background image of page 2
The Science of Nutrition-BIO (208): Week (WA5) to produce an alternate energy source, ketone bodies; normally  produced and used only in small quantities, ketone bodies can  efficiently provide fuel for brain cells”.  (p. 226)             On the understanding nutrition book “The liver is the most active processing  center in the body” (p. 207) it requires energy to convert the protein to glucose. The  energy comes from fat. As the liver breaks down the fat to release its energy to power  gluconeogenesis, which is in charge of making glucose of non-carbohydrate source, the 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/04/2012 for the course BIO 208 taught by Professor Steve during the Winter '11 term at Thomas Edison State.

Page1 / 8

W5-BIO208 - The Science of Nutrition-BIO (208): Week (WA5)...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online