SYLLABUS Sociology of Health and Illness syllabus spring 2011

SYLLABUS Sociology of Health and Illness syllabus spring 2011

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Sociology
of
Health
and
Illness
SOC
31358
(Section
3795)
 Spring
2011
 Monday
and
Wednesday
6:30
–
7:45
NAC
6/106
 
 Instructor:
 Jack
Levinson
 Email:
 
 jlevinson@ccny.cuny.edu
 Office:
 
 NAC
6/139
 Hours:

 Mondays
5
–
6
and
8
–
9
(If
absolutely
necessary,
students
may
see
me

 by
appointment
at
other
times.)
 
 Sociology
of
Health
and
Illness
 
 
 The
main
objective
of
this
course
is
to
use
the
concepts
and
methods
of
sociology
to
 understand
health,
illness,
disability
and
medicine.

At
the
same
time,
the
course
emphasizes
 how
these
major
life
areas
and
experiences
raise
sociology's
central
questions
about
power,
 authority,
and
knowledge.

More
specifically,
we
will
learn:

how
health,
illness,
and
health‐ related
practice
must
be
understood
also
from
a
variety
of
social
perspectives
and
not
merely
 a
medical
perspective;
about
ethical
issues
of
medical
and
health
practice
in
context;
and
 about
some
fundamental
historical
and
current
issues
in
health
policy
and
their
relation
to
 social
research.
 
 


 
 The
course
does
not
represent
a
clear
subfield
within
sociology.

This
is
because
 sociologists
(and
other
social
scientists)
have
studied
medicine,
health,
and
illness
in
a
 variety
of
ways.

Also,
new
questions
are
being
raised
for
social
inquiry
by
rapid
 transformations
in
medical
knowledge
and
practice
and
in
the
role
of
health‐related
 knowledge
in
social
life.


 
 
 The
course
covers
epidemiology
and
historical
transitions
in
population
health,
the
 social
production
of
disease
and
disease
categories,
cultural
aspects
of
health
and
disease,
 medicine
as
a
profession
and
work
practice,
organizational
and
collective
dimensions
of
 medicine
and
health,
technological
transformations
(in
medicine
and
in
the
nature
and
 experience
of
health
and
disease
generally),
and
how
medical
and
health‐related
knowledge
 and
authority
shape
contemporary
life.

We
will
wrap
up
the
semester
with
readings
that
 take
up
cultural
and
ethical
questions
about
the
role
of
health‐related
knowledge
in
American
 society,
the
process
of
"medicalization"
(the
extension
of
medical
authority
in
more
and
more
 aspects
of
life),
and
the
concept
of
risk
and
its
relation
to
a
contemporary
culture
of
 “healthism.”


 
 
 The
readings
are
drawn
mostly
from
different
areas
of
sociology
but
there
are
also
 readings
from
public
health,
history,
science
and
technology
studies,
journalism,
and
fiction.

 Film/video
and
web‐based
material
may
also
be
used
in
class.

The
course
sections
are
 organized
by
some
combination
of
problem,
approach,
and/or
field
but
they
are
all
tied
 together
by
a
few
basic
themes
that
run
through
the
course.

One
overarching
theme
is
the
 nature
of
authority
and
knowledge:

how
do
we
know
what
we
know
about
health,
medicine,
 etc.?

What
is
the
relationship
between
claims
and
evidence?

In
everyday
life?

In
popular
 media?

In
sociology
and
social
science?

In
public
health?

In
the
doctor's
office?


 
 
 
 1
 Course
Requirements
 
 All
the
readings
are
posted
on
blackboard.

Students
are
required
to
print
them
outand
have
 their
copies
of
the
relevant
readings
in
class.
 
 1)
Two
in‐class
examinations
on
Wednesday
March
23
and
Wednesday
May
18,
each
worth
 30%
of
your
grade.
 
 2)
A
ten
(10)
page
research
paper
on
a
topic
you
choose
(due
Monday
May
23),
worth
30%
of
 your
grade.


 
 Due
Wednesday
March
28:

a
roughly
250
word
preliminary
description
of
your
topic,
 the
social
questions
you
are
asking,
and
the
kinds
of
references
you
plan
to
use.


 
 Participation:

The
course
will
be
structured
as
a
lecture‐seminar
and
students
are
expected
 to
be
prepared
and
to
participate
in
discussion.

If
there
is
not
adequate
participation,
I
will
 call
on
individual
students
to
answer
questions
about
the
reading
or
topic
at
hand.


 
 Attendance:
I
am
required
by
the
College
to
take
attendance
for
a
certain
period
of
time.

 After
that,
I
will
not
take
attendance.

I
do
not
regard
this
is
a
part
of
my
responsibility
as
a
 college
teacher
because
I
regard
college
students
as
adults
who
are
voluntarily
participating
 in
their
education.

However,
a
sizable
number
of
students
take
advantage
of
this
attendance
 policy
and
every
semester
I
dole
out
an
unfortunate
number
of
Ds
and
Fs,
largely
because
 students
do
not
come
to
class.
 
 I
am
aware
that
most
students
work
and/or
have
family
responsibilities
that
may
on
rare
 occasions
require
missing
a
class.

If
you
have
a
personal
conflict,
please
come
to
my
office
 hours
and
discuss
it
with
me.


 
 Staying
with
the
program:

Obviously,
being
prepared
for
and
participating
in
class
requires
 being
in
class.

Staying
with
the
program
is
imperative
for
two
reasons.
 
 First,
some
of
the
crucial
concepts
and
themes
will
be
in
my
lectures
and
not
the
readings.

 This
means
that
I
will
teach
in
class
some
of
the
material
that
will
be
on
the
exams.

Being
in
 class
regularly
(and
prepared)
will
have
a
significant
impact
on
how
well
you
do
on
the
 exams.


 
 Second,
because
we
live
in
a
world
in
which
health
is
a
primary
concern,
our
very
subject
 matter
is
in
the
press
everyday
and
relevant
current
items
may
be
used
in
class.

I
do
not
 regard
this
syllabus
as
a
permanent
legal
document
but
as
informational
and
as
a
tentative
 guide
for
the
semester.

I
may
take
the
prerogative
to
introduce
current
issues,
press
 material,
and
other
items
that
result
in
a
departure
from
the
schedule
of
readings
listed
here.

 Students
are
responsible
for
knowing
where
we
are
and
what
changes
get
made.

For
this
 reason,
please
exchange
email
addresses
with
at
least
two
other
students
so
that
you
know
 what
is
going
on
in
the
unfortunate
and
rare
instance
that
you
must
miss
class.
I
would
like
to
 put
you
in
touch
with
each
other
for
this
purpose.

(Also,
I
encourage
you
to
form
study
 groups
outside
of
class,
especially
to
prepare
for
the
examinations.)
 
 
 2
 Schedule
of
Classes
 
 Monday
January
31:
 
 Introduction
to
the
course
 
 Sociology
of
Medicine
versus
Sociology
of
Health
and
Illness;
overview
of
the
relevant
 fields,
what
we’llbe
doing
in
the
course,
and
introduction
to
some
of
the
semester’s
 fundamental
concepts
and
themes.
 
 Wednesday
February
2:


 
 Epidemiology
and
the
idea
of
population
health
 
 McCord,
C.
and
H.P.
Freeman
“Excess
Mortality
in
Harlem.”
The
New
England
Journal
 of
Medicine
322(3):173,
1990.
 
 Monday
February
7:

 
 Geronimus,
A.,
Bound,
J.
and
T.
Waidman,
et
al.
“Excess
Mortality
Among
Blacks
in
the
 United
States.”
The
New
England
Journal
of
Medicine
335(21):1552‐8,
1996.
 
 Hutchinson,
R.N.,
Putt,
M.A.,
and
L.T.
Dean.
“Neighborhood
racial
composition,
social
 capital
and
black
all‐cause
mortality
in
Philadelphia.”
Social
Science
&
Medicine
 68:1859–1865,
2009.
 
 
 Wednesday
February
9:
 
 The
epidemiological
transition
 and
the
theory
of
the
“limits
of
modern
medicine”
 
 McKinlay,
John
B.
and
Sonia
M.
McKinlay
“Medical
Measures
and
the
Decline
of
 Mortality”
Milbank
Quarterly
Summer
1977.
 
 Monday
and
Wednesday
February
14
and
16:

 
 
 Marmot,
Michael
G.
and
Tores
Theorell
“Social
Class
and
Cardiovascular
Disease.”

 International
Journal
of
Health
Services
18:4,
1988.
 
 House,
James
S.
“Understanding
social
factors
and
inequalities
in
health:
20th
century
 progress
and
21st
Century
Prospects.”
Journal
of
Health
and
Social
Behavior
43:2,
 June
2002.
 
 Marmot,
Michael
G.
“Status
Syndrome:
A
Challenge
to
Medicine.”

JAMA,
March

 15,
295:
11,
2006.
 
 Monday
February
21
(No
class
–
President’s
Day)
 
 
 3
 Wednesday
February
23
(Wednesday
is
Monday
at
CUNY!):
 
 Link,
Bruce
G.
and
Jo
C.
Phelan
“Social
conditions
as
fundamental
causes
of
disease”
 Journal
of
Health
and
Social
Behavior
(Extra
Issue)
1995:
80‐94.
 
 Monday
February
28
and
Wednesday
March
2:
 
 The
social
and
cultural
production
of
disease

 
 Fuchs,
Victor
“A
Tale
of
Two
States”
excerpt
from
Who
Shall
Live?
(1974)
 
 Brown,
Phil
“Popular
Epidemiology:
Community
Response
to
Toxic
Waste‐Induced
 Diseased
in
Woburn,
Massachusetts”

Science,
Technology
and
Human
Values
12:3/4,
 1987.
 
 Monday
and
Wednesday
March
7
and
9:
 
 Smith,
Barbara
Ellen
“Black
Lung:

The
Social
Production
of
Disease.”
International
 Journal
of
Health
Services
11:3,
1981.
 
 Klinenberg,
Eric
“Dying
Alone:

The
Social
Production
of
Urban
Isolation.”

 Ethnography
2:4,
2001.
 
 Monday
and
Wednesday
March
14
and
16:
 
 Medicine
as
a
profession
 
 Wertz,
D.

1983.

“What
Has
Birth
Done
For
Doctors:

A
Historical
View.”

Women
and
 Health
8:1,
7‐24.
 
 Reverby,
Susan
“A
Caring
Dilemma:
Womanhood
and
Nursing
in
Historical
 Perspective”
Nursing
Research
36:1,
1987.
 
 Monday
March
21:

IN­CLASS
EXAM
 
 Wednesday
March
23
and
Monday
March
28:
 
 
 McKinlay,
John
B.
and
Lisa
D.
Marceau.
“The
End
of
the
Golden
Age
of
Doctoring.”

 International
Journal
of
Health
Services
32:2,
2002.
 
 DUE
Wednesday
March
28:

Description
of
term
paper
topic.
 
 Monday
and
Wednesday
April
4
and
6:
 
 Medicine
as
work
and
the
organization
of
professional
practice
 
 Bosk,
Charles
L.
and
Joel
E.
Frader
“AIDS
and
its
Impact
on
Medical
Work:

The
Culture
 and
Politics
of
the
Shop
Floor.”

Milbank
Quarterly
68:2,
1990.
 
 4
 
 Timmermans,
Stephan
“Social
Death
as
Self‐Fulfilling
Prophecy”

The
Sociological
 Quarterly
39:3,
1998.
 
 Fox,
Renee
“Cultural
Competence
and
the
Culture
of
Medicine.”
New
England
Journal
 of
Medicine
353:13,
September
29,
2005.
 
 Monday
and
Wednesday
April
11
and
13:


 
 
 
 
 Meaning,
knowing,
and
experience:
different
perspectives
 
 Conrad,
Peter

“A
Mirage
of
Genes.”
Sociology
of
Health
&
Illness

21:2,
1999.
 
 Grob,
R.
“Is
my
sick
child
healthy?
Is
my
healthy
child
sick?:
Changing
parental
 experiences
of
cystic
fibrosis
in
the
age
of
expanded
newborn
screening.”
Social
 Science
&
Medicine
67:1056–1064,
2008.
 
 Spring
Recess
4/17
–
4/26
 
 Wednesday
April
27:
 
 
 Conrad,
Peter
“The
Meaning
of
Medications:
Another
Look
at
Compliance.”
Social
 Science
and
Medicine,
20:1,
1985.
 
 Fox,
Nick,
Ward,
Katie,
and
Alan
O’Rourke
“Pro‐anorexia,
weight
loss
drugs
and
the
 internet:
an
‘anti‐recovery’
explanatory
model
of
anorexia.”

Sociology
of
Health
&
 Illness,
2005.
 
 Monday
and
Wednesday
May
2
and
4:
 
 Frank,
Arthur
“The
Remission
Society”
excerpt
from
The
Wounded
Storyteller
(1997)
 
 Gawande,
Atul.
"Letting
Go."
The
New
Yorker
2
Aug,
2010:
36.

 
 Monday
and
Wednesday
May
9
and
11:
 
 Medicalization
and
Risk
 
 Zola,
Irving
K.
“Medicine
as
an
Institution
of
Social
Control”
Sociological
Review
20,
 1972.
 
 Lupton,
Deborah
“Risk
as
Moral
Danger:

The
Social
and
Political
Functions
of
Risk
in
 Public
Health”

International
Journal
of
Health
Services
23(3),
1993.
 
 Alcabes,
P.
“Epidemiologists
Need
to
Shatter
the
Myth
of
a
Risk
Free
Life"

Chronicle
of
 Higher
Education
2003
 
 Wypijewski,
JoAnne
“The
Secret
Sharer”
Harper's
Magazine
297:1778,
July
1998.
 
 5
 Monday
May
16:
 
 Rothman,
D.
“A
century
of
failure:
health
care
reform
in
America.”
Journal
of
Health
 Politics,
Policy,
and
Law
18(2):271‐86,
1993.
 
 Gawande,
A.
“The
Cost
Conundrum:
Annals
of
Medicine.”
The
New
Yorker
85(16):36,
 June
1,
2009.
 
 Wednesday
May
18:

IN­CLASS
EXAM

 
 6
 ...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online