Lecture 3 - Jan 10th

Lecture 3 - Jan 10th - On the Uses and Limits of the Big...

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On the Uses and Limits of the Big Five Trait Dimensions Introduction to Personality January 10 2011 1 Midterm Exam will be Wed Feb 16 th 6:00 to 7:30 PM Thursday, February 10, 2011
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Questions of the day: How are the Big Five useful? How are the Big Five limited? What else do we need to know about a person? 3 Thursday, February 10, 2011
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Another Film Clip from the O f ce How would you describe Jim’s personality? How would you describe Michael’s personality? 4 - party at Jim’s house; Michael Scott the Boss is there and they don’t want him there. - Boss is low on agreeableness (can’t relate to other people well, doesn’t realize that other’s don’t like him, etc) - he is moody and maybe neurotic - with a guy like him you wonder if there are really people like him in the world - Prof wouldn’t want anyone to judge him based on how he behaves at parties - 1st level of personality (the first thing we notice according to McAdams) is the broad consistencies in social and emotional behavior - one very important thing is that there is a taxonomy and way to organize all the different trait descriptions we may apply to people’s personality. It is useful but limited Thursday, February 10, 2011
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Features of the Big Five meant to apply to all people (we should be able to rank order weather peope are low or high in regard to these traits. you can do this with other cultures and languages and it seems you will always ±nd these 5 categories of personality traits) Bipolar (always extroversion vs introversion, etc) Comparative (we can compare to others on the same dimension to see where one stands but we don’t see what is speci±cally unique about a speci±c person just how they compare to others in similarity. Ex. Jim wanted to have a party maybe because he wanted Pam at his house but he knows that Michael Scoot is embarrassing and will ruin it and make everyone uncomfortable so he tried not to let Michael Scott know about it. Michael Scott ±nds out by looking through emails and he shows up and Jim is frustrated and annoyed and not only did he come but he made himself the life of the party. Michael starts singing the girl part of the Duet and we don’t know what Jim is going to do and he gets up and sings along with him even though this is a potential con²ict and di f culties and this tells you something about Jim that we can’t label with a trait description) Non-conditional De-contextualized 5 Thursday, February 10, 2011
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Are the Big 5 Useful? Is it measuring something real? Is there agreement among diverse raters? 6 Thursday, February 10, 2011
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7 have a large sample of people complete self reports and ask other individuals who know the person to complete reports about them (spouse, friends, etc) - for each of the big 5 dimensions you end up with an average rank ordering and you can correlated the score when completed by themselves to the ones obtained from the person who knows them well. There are
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Lecture 3 - Jan 10th - On the Uses and Limits of the Big...

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