ECE 231 -6

ECE 231 -6 - ECE-231 Circuits and Systems I Fall 2011...

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ECE-231 Circuits and Systems I Fall 2011 Session 6 Dr. Stewart Personick Office: ECEC Room 331 [email protected]
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New Materials Energy Storage Components Capacitors Inductors Voltage sources and current sources whose values vary with time: v(t), i(t) Circuits that incorporate time varying sources, resistors, capacitors, and inductors
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Mechanical Analogy A ball on a half pipe: Starts (as shown) with only stored potential energy: E= G x m x h h
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Mechanical Analogy A ball on a half pipe: Starts (as shown) with only stored potential energy: E= G x m x h Transitions to only stored kinetic energy: E= ½ mvmax2 h vmax
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Mechanical Analogy A ball on a half pipe: Starts (as shown) with only stored potential energy: E= G x m x h Transitions to only stored kinetic energy: E= ½ mvmax2 Then transitions to only stored potential energy: E= G x m x h h
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Mechanical Analogy A ball on a half pipe: At any point in between, the energy of the ball is: E= G x m x h(t) + ½ m v2(t) h
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Mechanical Analogy A ball on a half pipe: At any point in between, the energy of the ball is: E= G x m x h(t ) + ½ m v2(t) = a constant value of energy If the half-pipe has a parabolic shape, where h= bz2 Then: E = G x m x b x z2(t) + ½ m v2(t) h z=0 z z=(h/b)0.5
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Network component: Capacitor Capacitance = C (Farads) a b A capacitor consists of a pair of parallel plates, which have area A (m2) and spacing d (m)
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Network component: Capacitor Capacitance = C (Farads) - e - e - e - e e e e e e =the electron charge = -1.6 x 10-19 Coulombs The voltage across the capacitor that results from the presence of the charge on the plates is Vab = Q/C. where: Q is the charge, in Coulombs on the left plate [= - the charge, in Coulombs, on the right plate]; and C is the capacitance of the capacitor (Farads) From physics: C is approximately: the plate area/the plate spacing x ε r x ε 0 Where: ε 0 is the electric constant ( ε 0 ≈ 8.854×10−12 F m–1), and
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2012 for the course ECE 231 taught by Professor Pietrucha during the Spring '08 term at NJIT.

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ECE 231 -6 - ECE-231 Circuits and Systems I Fall 2011...

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