{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chapter 22-pgs 753-758 - A.P.US Mods6/7/8...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A.P. US Artem Kholodenko Mods 6/7/8 0109 Notes for pgs. 753 – 758 A Divided Republican Party Ballinger-Pinchot Affair National Progressivism-   Phase II: Woodrow Wilson The Four-Way Election of   1912 Bull Moose Party - The Insurgents were a small group of (R) during TR’s time, which  challenged the party’s congressional leadership; (La Follette and  Beveridge) - In 1909 the group turned against Taft in battle over tariff - At first Tat thought too, that tariff should be lowered, but in 1909,  when the Senate voted for the Payne-Aldrich Act, Taft abandoned  his ideas and praised the tariff bill - A target of Insurgents was Speaker of House, Joseph G. Cannon  of IL, who wanted ruthless politics - In March 1910 the Insurgents joined the (D) against “Cannonism”  to pass an amendment to rules, (by George Norris) and to  remove Cannon from Rules Committee; they won - Taft got  slapped, supporting Cannon - TR was sent letters about Taft’s bad rule and got into arguments  with him, especially over this incident - Richard A. Ballinger was Taft’s sec. of interior: conservative  lawyer, disliked federal controls and wanted private development  of natural resources - He approved a sale of land of several millions of acres in Alaska  w/rich coal deposits to businessmen - The group sold the land to another group, which J.P. Morgan was  part of - Louis R. Glavis was fired when protesting these actions - Gifford Pinchot also got fired when he criticized Ballinger in a  congressional testimony in Jan. 1910 -
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}