{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Distressed Real Estate - $150, purchase, onlyif(1)(IRR,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Assuming that I have acquired $150,000 in cash to be used specifically for a distressed real estate  purchase, a determination on whether or not to make the purchase would be financially feasible  only if: (1) the Internal Rate of Return (IRR), or the rate of return on the appreciation in the  value of the distressed property, is greater than the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC)  and (2) the Net Present Value (NPV) of the distressed property is positive. Internal rate of return (IRR) is the flip side of net present value (NPV) and is based on the same  principles and the same math. NPV shows the value of a stream of future cash flows discounted  back to the present by some percentage that represents the minimum desired rate of return, often  a company's cost of capital. IRR, on the other hand, computes a break-even rate of return. It  shows the discount rate below which an investment results in a positive NPV and above which an  investment results in a negative NPV. It is the breakeven discount rate, the rate at which the value  of cash outflows equals the value of cash inflows.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}