OB+Comparison+LT+Draft[1]

OB+Comparison+LT+Draft[1] - Running head: ORGANIZATIONAL...

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Running head: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR COMPARISONS 1 Organizational Behavior Comparisons University of Phoenix MGT307 ANDY WAGSTAFF October 25, 2010
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Organizational Behavior Comparisons Introduction Organizational Behavior and Culture Defined Organizational behavior (OB) is the study of how people, groups, and teams of people perform in an organization as a whole. Those who study OB try to understand, predict, and influence how these people and groups interact with one another to improve performance and outcomes (Wienclaw, 2008). There are no two organizational cultures that have members that exhibit the same organizational behavior, however, many similar traits can be found in members of any organization. Organizational culture is defined as shared actions, values, and beliefs that develop in an organization and that guide its members’ behaviors and actions. Organizational behavior is influenced by both internal and external factors. Internal factors are those forces that are within a worker’s control, while external factors are those that can be attributed to forces outside the organization such as the economy, government officials, or factors beyond a workers control such as outdated equipment and technologies (Schermerhorn, Hunt & Osborn, 2008.) Because our team members’ background, in terms of interacting with people and their behaviors, is extremely eclectic, in this paper we will attempt to describe how the various internal and external factors of OB compare and contrast in our various walks of life —our workplace, our homes, and within the community as part of charitable organizations. We will examine these six organizations and compare and contrast how the restructuring, organizational mission, fiscal policy, competition, the economy, customer demands, and how globalization affect behavior among these different groups.
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Organizational Restructure Organizational restructuring can occur within an organization or can be created when two or more organizations combine into one entity. The behavior of an organization or individuals may need realigning as the new organizational structure takes shape (Schermerhorn, et.al, 2008). With technology and the economy ever changing, it is important that organizational development (OD) facilitators stay in communication with individuals at all levels of an organization to maintain the best organizational behavior. Organizational restructuring can occur in any organization, small or large, which may believe it needs to adapt to new trends in technology or the economy. Organizational restructure can create tensions between individuals and management. Success of organizational restructuring is highly dependent on the communications skills within the organization, from the CEO to the newest member. Any changes in an organization need to be supported by top managers as well as subordinates for the organization
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2012 for the course ACC all taught by Professor All during the Spring '12 term at University of Phoenix.

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OB+Comparison+LT+Draft[1] - Running head: ORGANIZATIONAL...

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