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Chapter_28_Protists - CHAPTER 28 PROTISTS Prepared by...

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1 CHAPTER 28 PROTISTS Prepared by Brenda Leady, University of Toledo
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2 Eukaryotes that are not classified in the plant, animal, or fungal kingdoms, though some protists are closely related to plants or animals or fungi Two common characteristics Most abundant in moist habitats Most of them are microscopic in size Do not form monophyletic group Supergroups used
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3 Fig 28.1
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4 Classified by ecological role 3 major groups Algae – photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic Not monophyletic Protozoa – heterotrophic Not monophyletic Fngus-like – resemble fungi in body form and absorptive nutrition More closely related to diatoms
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5 Fig 28.2
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6 Fig 28.3
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7 Classified by habitat Particularly common and diverse in oceans, lakes, wetlands and rivers Plankton - swimming or floating Plankton also includes bacteria, viruses, and small animals Phytoplankton – photosynthetic Protozoan plankton – heterotrophic Occur primarily as single cells, colonies or short filaments
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8 Fig. 28.4
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9 Periphyton Attached by mucilage to underwater surfaces Produce multicellular bodies Seaweeds Fig. 28.4
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10 Classified by motility Swim using eukaryotic flagella Flagellates (rapidly bend and straighten, pushing and/or pulling) Some flagellated reproductive cells Cilia – shorter and more abundant than flagella Ciliates (usually larger than flagellates) Amoeboid movement – using pseudopodia Amoebae Gliding on protein or carbohydrate slime
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11 Fig 28.5
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12 Supergroups Excavata Related to some of Earth’s earliest eukaryotes Named for a feeding groove “excavated” into the cells of many representatives Food particles are taken into cells by phagotrophy Endocytosis and evolutionary basis for endosymbiosis
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13 Fig 28.6
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