case 3 Modeling - Modeling We begin by modeling this...

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Unformatted text preview: Modeling We begin by modeling this problem. Modeling a problem using linear programming involves writing it in the language of linear programming. There are rules about what you can and cannot do within linear programming . These rules are in place to make sure that the remaining steps of the process (solving and interpreting) can be successful. Key to a linear program is the decision variables, objective, and constraints. Decision Variables The decision variables represent (unknown) decisions to be made. This is in contrast to problem data, which are values that are either given or can be simply calculated from what is given. For this problem, the decision variables are the number of notebooks to produce and the number of desktops to produce. We will represent these unknown values by x1 and x2 respectively. To make the numbers more manageable, we will let x 1 be the number of 1000 notebooks produced (so x 1 = 5 means a decision to produce 5000 notebooks) and x 2 be the number of 1000 desktops . Note that a value like the quarterly profit is not (in this model) a decision Variable :...
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case 3 Modeling - Modeling We begin by modeling this...

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