Drug abuse and Addiction

Drug abuse and Addiction - ADDICTION Psychology 100 Dr...

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Unformatted text preview: ADDICTION Psychology 100 Dr. Claire Ashton-James WHAT IS ADDICTION? Addiction is a chronic but treatable brain disorder in which people lose the ability to control their need for alcohol or other drugs. Addiction is most apparent when people cannot stop taking alcohol or drugs despite negative health, legal, financial, or social consequences This lack of control is the result of alcohol- or drug-induced changes in the brain. Those changes, in turn, cause behavior changes. WHAT IS ADDICTION? The brains of addicted people have been modified by the drug in such a way that absence of the drug makes a signal to their brain that is equivalent to the signal of when you are starving. It is as if the individual was in a state of deprivation, where taking the drug is indispensable for survival. It's as powerful as that. National Institute on Drug Abuse Director Dr. Nora Volkow. WHAT IS ADDICTION? Addiction grows more serious over time. Substance use disorders travel along a continuum. This progression can be measured by the amount, frequency and context of a person's substance use. May begin using in situation that are not socially acceptable, or in situations that they person never imagined they would Personal values and beliefs are shifted to become consistent with the addictive behaviour SYMPTOMS OF ADDICTION A person is dependent if their pattern of substance use leads to impairment or distress shown by three or more of the following in a 12- month period: 1. Tolerance as defined by any of the following: a need for markedly increased amounts of the substance to achieve intoxication or desired effect markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of the substance SYMPTOMS OF ADDICTION 2. Withdrawal, as manifested by either of the following: the characteristic withdrawal symptom of the substance the same or a closely related substance is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms SYMPTOMS OF ADDICTION 3. The substance is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended (loss of control) 4. There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control substance use (loss of control) 5. A great deal of time is spent in activities necessary to obtain the substance, use the substance or recover from its effects (preoccupation) SYMPTOMS OF ADDICTION...
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Drug abuse and Addiction - ADDICTION Psychology 100 Dr...

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