4 - Gram Positive Cocci Staphylococcus aureus...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Gram Positive Cocci Staphylococcus aureus “Staphule” means grape in Greek Toxins are quite the problem: Cytotoxins Haemolysins Enterotoxin (A-E, G-I) Exfoliative toxins (ETA, ETB ) Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (used to be exotoxin C and enterotoxin F) Staphylococcus aureus Enzymes: Coagulase (coagulation of fibrin) made by almost all pathogenic staphylococci used in laboratory test to differentiate from S. epidermidis, Staphylococcus. capitis and Staphylococcus. saprophyticus. it has bactra in positive test Beta-lactamase (penicillinase) destroys penicillin Staphylococcus aureus Many S. aureus strains are found in normal population (~15%) Carried in anterior nares, axilla, perineum and hands Problem: 85-90% of strains isolated in hospital are penicillin resistant!!! Localized purulent infections (pustules, boils, styes, conjunctivitis, otitis, etc.) Pneumonia, osteomyelitis, septicaemia, endocarditis Food poisoning, toxic shock syndrome, scalded skin syndrome Staphylococcus aureus Important cause of hospital acquired nosocomial infections from stitch abcesses, infected wounds, or generalized infections Preventative measures include Aseptic technique in ER and OR, wound precaution Education of health personnel Handwashing! Staphylococcus epidermidis Part of normal skin/mucous membrane flora Non-pathogenic, except in compromised patients where can cause post-operative infections (brain, open heart, endocarditis, shunt infections) Considered an opportunistic pathogen Streptococci Arranged in pairs or forming chains “streptos” - Greek word for twisted subdivided into “groups” based on haemolytic properties (alpha, beta) carboydrate C antigen (Lancefield classification) M-protein divides beta-haemolytic mostly group A Rebecca Craighill Lancefield (1895-1981) Streptococcus pyogenes...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/02/2012 for the course ITI 1121 taught by Professor Samaan during the Winter '10 term at University of Ottawa.

Page1 / 29

4 - Gram Positive Cocci Staphylococcus aureus...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online