contextual-inquiry - Contextual Inquiry and Interviews...

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Contextual Inquiry and Interviews Brian Bailey
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Announcements roject proposals ue today user isit Project proposals due today, user visit plans due Friday User visit reports and task analysis due next week
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Today’s Lecture sight enabled by Insight enabled by understanding users ontextual inquiry Contextual inquiry and interviews lecture based on book some slides adapted from T. Parikh and J. obbrock n CI Wobbrock on CI Beyer & Holtzblatt, 1998
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An Analogy uppose you wanted to learn how to Suppose you wanted to learn how to drive a car. As a first step, should you: A) Assume you can figure it out on your own B) Have an online discussion with Facebook friends C) Watch driving lessons on YouTube D) Ride along with someone who knows how to drive, observe what they do, and ask questions
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Contextual Inquiry (CI) “The core premise of Contextual Inquiry is very simple: go where the customer works, observe pg , the customer as he or she works, and talk to the customer about the work. Do that, and you can’t help but gain a better understanding of your customer. ” Beyer and Holtzblatt, Contextual Design , 1998
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Origin of CI erative methods championed in 80 0s Iterative methods championed in 80-90s prototyping and user testing dominant Create a process that would inspire new design directions rather than iteration
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Benefits of CI evelop shared understanding Develop shared understanding Reveals hidden aspects of work that may e implicit in the user’s understanding be implicit in the user’s understanding Anchor ideas and decisions in data Learn about relevant constraints Build rapport with users Adapted from T. Parikh
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Contextual Design erform contextual inquiry Perform contextual inquiry Model and consolidate the data Translate into design solutions
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The Inquiry o to the user’s environment Go to the user s environment Observe real work Ask questions Take notes
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Models of Inquiry pprentice / Master Apprentice / Master teaches while doing lows discovery of subtle details allows discovery of subtle details reduces need for formal interview Other (incorrect) models scientist/subject; expert/novice; guest/host
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Good “Apprentice” e a keen observer
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contextual-inquiry - Contextual Inquiry and Interviews...

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