lec12-iox4 - Page 1 CS162 Operating Systems and Systems...

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Unformatted text preview: Page 1 CS162 Operating Systems and Systems Programming Lecture 12 Kernel/User, I/O, Disks February 29, 2012 Anthony D. Joseph and Ion Stoica http://inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~cs162 12.2 2/29/2012 Anthony D. Joseph and Ion Stoica CS162 UCB Spring 2012 Dual Mode Operation: Kernel versus User Mode I/O Systems Hardware Access Device Drivers Disk Performance Hardware performance parameters Note: Some slides and/or pictures in the following are adapted from slides 2005 Silberschatz, Galvin, and Gagne. Many slides generated from my lecture notes by Kubiatowicz. Goals for Today 12.3 2/29/2012 Anthony D. Joseph and Ion Stoica CS162 UCB Spring 2012 Review: Example of General Address Translation Prog 1 Virtual Address Space 1 Prog 2 Virtual Address Space 2 Code Data Heap Stack Code Data Heap Stack Data 2 Stack 1 Heap 1 OS heap & Stacks Code 1 Stack 2 Data 1 Heap 2 Code 2 OS code OS data Translation Map 1 Translation Map 2 Physical Address Space 12.4 2/29/2012 Anthony D. Joseph and Ion Stoica CS162 UCB Spring 2012 Dual-Mode Operation Can an application modify its own translation maps? If it could, could get access to all of physical memory Has to be restricted somehow To assist with protection, hardware provides at least two modes (Dual-Mode Operation): Kernel mode (or supervisor or protected) User mode (Normal program mode) Mode set with bits in special control register only accessible in kernel-mode Intel processors actually have four rings of protection: PL (Privilege Level) from 0 3 PL0 has full access, PL3 has least Typical OS kernels on Intel processors only use PL0 (kernel) and PL3 (user) Page 2 12.5 2/29/2012 Anthony D. Joseph and Ion Stoica CS162 UCB Spring 2012 For Protection, Lock User-Programs in Asylum Idea: Lock user programs in padded cell with no exit or sharp objects Cannot change mode to kernel mode User cannot modify translation maps Limited access to memory: cannot adversely effect other processes Side-effect: Limited access to memory-mapped I/O operations What else needs to be protected? A couple of issues How to share CPU between kernel and user programs? Kinda like both the inmates and the warden in asylum are the same person. How do you manage this??? How does one switch between kernel and user modes? OS user (kernel user mode): getting into cell User OS (user kernel mode): getting out of cell 12.6 2/29/2012 Anthony D. Joseph and Ion Stoica CS162 UCB Spring 2012 How to get from Kernel User What does the kernel do to create a new user process? Allocate and initialize process control block Read program off disk and store in memory Allocate and initialize translation map Point at code in memory so program can execute Possibly point at statically initialized data Run Program: Set machine registers Set hardware pointer to translation table...
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lec12-iox4 - Page 1 CS162 Operating Systems and Systems...

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