Rhetoric Prospectus 2

Rhetoric Prospectus 2 - Running head: CAPTAIN (DIVIDED)...

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Running head: CAPTAIN (DIVIDED) AMERICA 1 Captain (Divided) America: Rhetorical Narrative Criticism of Ed Brubaker’s Captain America Comics University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Abstract
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Running head: CAPTAIN (DIVIDED) AMERICA 2 Comic books can reflect and comment on society. Ed Brubaker’s work on Captain America forms a narrative that reflects American division and paranoia in a post-9/11 world. This paper examines Brubaker’s Captain America comics in terms of their narrative and rhetorical significance. Readers are invited to achieve consubstantiality with Captain America, and observe a model of post 9/11 dissent. Keywords: Captain America, comic books, narrative, rhetoric
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Running head: CAPTAIN (DIVIDED) AMERICA 3 Captain (Divided) America Comic book creators Joe Simon and Jack Kirby wanted to create a hit comic book character which bolstered American patriotism in a time of anxiety. Their creation, Captain America, hit newsstands like a thunderbolt on December 20,1940, sporting a cover that showed the star-spangled Captain punching Adolf Hitler in the face (Evanier, 2008). The issue was a tremendous hit. Captain America’s adventures continued to be published in the intervening decades, and were chronicled by a host of writers and artists. Perhaps the character’s longevity can be attributed to the ways in which the various creators used the character to craft narratives that spoke to the American spirit at the time they created their particular stories. These rhetorical narratives make some of Captain America’s stories stand out from comics featuring other costumed adventurers. Writer Ed Brubaker, along with several talented artists, had the opportunity to relaunch the Captain America comic book with a new #1 issue. Published in 2005, this issue started off a run of stories that reflected American uncertainties regarding terrorism, corporate malfeasance, and ideological division. Brubaker described his take on the character: “I always thought, ‘Cap doesn’t need to find America, America needs to find The comic books reprinted in Captain America by Ed Brubaker Omnibus Vol. 1 are worthy of scholarly attention because they constitute a rhetorical narrative which reflects American attitudes and politics during the time they were created, and also offers an understanding of how dissent should function. This paper surveys extant literature regarding rhetorical narrative, the existence of rhetorical narrative in superhero comic
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Running head: CAPTAIN (DIVIDED) AMERICA 4 books, and the state of dissent post 9/11. These notions are used to generate analytical questions for how this research methodology can be applied to the Captain America comics reprinted in the Captain America by Ed Brubaker Omnibus Vol. 1. Finally, the paper speculates on the portable knowledge regarding dissent that can potentially generated by carrying out this study. The Narrative Perspective
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This note was uploaded on 03/06/2012 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Hansen during the Spring '07 term at Wisconsin.

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Rhetoric Prospectus 2 - Running head: CAPTAIN (DIVIDED)...

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