Animal Welfare, Animal Rights--The Past, the Present, and the 21st Century - Silberman

Animal Welfare, Animal Rights--The Past, the Present, and the 21st Century - Silberman

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Animal Welfare, Animal Rights: The Past, the Present, and the 21st Century Author(s): Morton S. Silberman Source: TheJournalofZooAnimalMedicine, Vol. 19, No. 4 (Dec., 1988), pp. 161-167 Published by: American Association of Zoo Veterinarians Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20094884 . Accessed: 15/08/2011 16:54 . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. American Association of Zoo Veterinarians is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Journal of Zoo Animal Medicine. http://www.jstor.org
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Journal of Zoo Animal Medicine 19(4): 161-167, 1988 Copyright 1988 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians EDITORIAL ANIMAL WELFARE, ANIMAL RIGHTS: THE PAST, THE PRESENT, AND THE 21ST CENTURY Morton S. Silberman, D.V.M. Abstract: Enactment of animal welfare legislation and the characteristics these laws have taken parallel the evolution of the animal welfare and humane movement. As we move into the 21 st century, zoological collections, wildlife management activities, and the entire spectrum of captive animal management will be challenged to meet new standards. Key words: Animal welfare, rights, laws, humane. INTRODUCTION One can speculate that concern for an an imal's well-being originated with the cap tive management of a variety of species. Concepts of what "well-being" represents have changed with the ages, but it would be hard to believe that even during the earliest captive rearing of animals certain humane principles were not invoked. Husbandry that promotes well-being is a synonym for hu mane treatment. There has been an evolution in the whole vista of what traditionally was considered humane care and treatment of animals. This has developed into two main movements, some suggesting a third middle movement that borrows from both ends of the spec trum. One movement is that of the tradi tional humane interest groups who feel that their goals embody an enhancement of an imals' life quality. They care for stray ani mals, fight animal abuse (i.e., unsatisfactory housing, poor nutrition, physical torment, etc.), and generally concern themselves with "quality of life" issues. In general these groups are not against biom?dical research, zoos, or food animal production. Without question, they favor excellent treatment of animals, the cessation of what they deem needless animal use, and they want the re search community to strive for alternative methodology and a reduction in animal numbers.
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Animal Welfare, Animal Rights--The Past, the Present, and the 21st Century - Silberman

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