MR (Week 6 Paper) - Brennan, Camm, and Tanas (2009) - MR Validity

MR (Week 6 Paper) - Brennan, Camm, and Tanas (2009) - MR Validity

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6 der markt 2007/1+2 Linda Brennan/Jim Camm/Janusz K Tanas Validity in Market Resear alidity in Market Resear alidity in Market Resear alidity in Market Resear alidity in Market Research Practice: ‘New’ is ch Practice: ‘New’ is ch Practice: ‘New’ is ch Practice: ‘New’ is Not Always ‘Impr Not Always ‘Impr Not Always ‘Impr Not Always ‘Impr Not Always ‘Improved’ oved’ oved’ oved’ oved’ ABSTRACT Market research suppliers want to provide a dif- ferentiated product or service offering to their cli- ents. However, the frequent need to appear ‘new’ results in adaptation of research to different con- texts. This has consequences for validity. In this paper we make the case for tempering the existing enthusiasm for constant ‘innovation’ in market re- search methodologies. In particular, we argue that unfettered adaptation can lead to the generation of invalid findings. We demonstrate some methods of how invalid results can develop. Finally we explain current concepts of ‘validity’ and provide an inno- vative way of showing the relationship between the dozen or more varieties of validity that are commonly used in the literature(s). This paper aims to remind practitioners and academics alike, that concepts of validity are important and that there is no point in having a perfectly reliable, but completely invalid, measurement tool. Keywords: Validity, methodology, market research 1. Introduction Innovation is a necessary precondition for pro- gress and subsequent advancement in any field. We accept this as self-evident. At the same time it is legitimate to ask the question whether or not all in- novation is ‘good’ for the field of market research, or can innovation lead us away from good practice in research? 2. The pressure to appear new and different There is, no doubt, a pressure from clients of mar- ket research to innovate. There is also pressure on marketing academics to make ‘new’ contributions to the body of knowledge (BOK). While the focus of this paper is on market research suppliers, the les- sons presented here are apposite for academics as well. The problems of marketing are complex and often appear to be intractable, relating as they do, to the behaviour of consumers. Therefore, there will always be some unfinished business, some untur- ned stone or a yet-to-be-explored angle awaiting every brand and marketing manager. Furthermore, there is constant pressure on these same marke- ters to get an edge on their competitors. Competiti- ve advantage does not come about by doing more of what the competition is already doing. It comes about by being out there and taking the lead in the market, being creative, taking risks, and dealing with the consequences in a complex and rapidly chan- ging business environment (Hult, Ketchen, and Sla- ter 2005; Vanderkaay 2005). Indeed, there are more success stories in marketing that relate to risk ta- king and imagination than there are relating to in-
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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2012 for the course MARKETING eng100 taught by Professor Hass during the Spring '12 term at Central Washington University.

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MR (Week 6 Paper) - Brennan, Camm, and Tanas (2009) - MR Validity

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