Lecture6 Presentation

Lecture6 Presentation - ENGR 210 Statics and Dynamics...

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1 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012 ENGR 210 – Statics and Dynamics Lecture 6 Truss analysis Girum Urgessa March 07, 2012
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2 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012 OUTLINE 1. Truss definitions (6.1) 2. The method of joints (6.2) 3. The method of sections (6.4) 4. Zero-force members (6.3)
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3 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012 1. Truss definitions A truss is an assembly of slender, straight members that carry loads primarily through axial forces (tension or compression) The individual members can be made from steel, wood or concrete
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4 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012 Members are connected with each other by gusset plates, bolts/pins through members, metal connector plates etc. .
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5 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012 I-35W Mississippi River Bridge
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6 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012
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7 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012 Planar trusses (where the members and the loads lie in the same plane) are typically used for roof systems and bridges
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8 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012
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9 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012
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10 LECTURE 6 – March 07, 2012 The weight of the members are typically ignored compared to the load that they carry The center lines of the connecting members are usually assumed to be concurrent
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Lecture6 Presentation - ENGR 210 Statics and Dynamics...

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