IND 300 - W12_ M7

IND 300 - W12_ M7 - IND 300 Introduction to Management...

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1 IND 300 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT IND 300 Introduction to Management Winter 2012 Ch M7
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2 IND 300 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT Defining and Commencing Collective Bargaining This section will address: – The effects of certification. – The framework for collective bargaining. – Preparing for collective bargaining.
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The Effects of Certification Now that a union is in place, the employer cannot negotiate one-on-one with employees. – Both the employer and the union are compelled to commence collective bargaining. So as to ensure there is a level financial playing field between the resources of the union and those of the employer, there are union security clauses found in labour legislation. Examples of union security clauses: – Dues check-off. – The Rand Formula. – Closed shop or union shop. – Hiring hall. – Union expulsion. 3 IND 300 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT Source: Wiley (2007)
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The Framework for Collective Bargaining The Structure of Collective Bargaining: – “Structure” refers to the number of unions, employers, workplaces, or industries represented in a particular collective bargaining situation. – The simplest and most common bargaining structure is “single unit-single employer,” but more complex structures are possible. – Groups of employers or unions may bargain as a single entity – this helps avoid pattern bargaining or whipsawing where a union uses an agreement with one employer to pressure others. 4 IND 300 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT Source: Wiley (2007)
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THE FRAMEWORK FOR COLLECTIVE BARGAINING The Participants in Collective Bargaining There are generally two teams of negotiators, one team representing the union and the other representing the employer. What can be bargained for? – Most common issues are wages, benefits, hours of work, procedures for hiring and promotion, discipline and discharge, and working conditions. – While no issue is prohibited from being negotiated, most
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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2012 for the course IND IND300 taught by Professor Dr.sanjeevbhole during the Winter '12 term at Ryerson.

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IND 300 - W12_ M7 - IND 300 Introduction to Management...

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