d17773_multiwork_1

Human Resource Management (Available Titles Coursemate)

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1 Staying Ahead of the Curve The AARP Work and Career Study EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
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Staying Ahead of the Curve: The AARP Work and Career Study A National Survey Conducted for AARP by RoperASW September 2002 Xenia Montenegro, Ph.D., Project Manager, Knowledge Management, AARP Linda Fisher, Ph.D., Associate Research Director, Knowledge Management, AARP Shereen Remez, Ph.D., Director of Knowledge Management, AARP ©2002 AARP May be copied only for noncommercial purposes and with attribution; permission required for all other purposes. AAR P, Membership, Knowledge Management, 601 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20049
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Staying Ahead of the Curve: The AARP Work and Career Study Executive Summary The confluence of two important demographic shifts promises to reshape the U.S. workforce over the next decade and beyond. First, there will be more workers over age 55. In 2000, 13 percent of the workforce was 55 and older, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and by 2015, this figure is expected to rise to 20 percent. During the same period, the highest growth rate in the U.S. workforce will be among workers aged 55 to 64. That change is fueled in large part by the leading edge of the baby boom population, which is now crossing the age 55 threshold in large—and expand- ing—numbers. It also reflects the fact that Americans are leading longer and healthier lives, enabling them to extend their stay in the working world. As the boomer population moves through the workforce and retires, there will be more jobs than workers to fill them. This is due in large part to the smaller size of the generations following the boomer cohort. Consequently, the U.S. will grow older and face critical shortages of qualified workers, especially in the dominant and growing service sectors of the economy. The labor shortages of tomorrow pose urgent questions today to public policy makers, businesses and workers alike, principal among them: what must we do to recruit, retain, train and address needs of older workers, whose sheer numbers and experience will make them an invaluable commodity in the workplace? To answer this and related questions, AARP, which has long examined older worker trends in its research and addressed their implications through its programming and advocacy, turned to older American workers themselves. We asked them to discuss their perspectives, desires, fears and needs regarding work and work life balance issues, and from that conversation comes this report, Staying Ahead of the Curve: The AARP Work and Career Study. Staying Ahead of the Curve is based on a national survey conducted for AARP in May and June 2002 by RoperASW. We interviewed 2,518 workers ages 45-74, including a representative national sample of 1,500 workers, as well as over- samples of African American, Hispanic and Asian American 45+ workers.
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d17773_multiwork_1 - Staying Ahead of AARP Work and Career...

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