Group Posting

Human Resource Management (Available Titles Coursemate)

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Group Posting (1 – 10) 1. Younger workers tend to have higher job satisfaction that older ones. False, as our population is growing older and our workforce is retiring, our HR managers are being “faced with significant challenges in replacing them with workers having the capabilities and work ethic that characterize many mature workers in the United States” . There is a huge difference between older workers and younger ones. Older workers have more experience and knowledge then the younger ones. Also older workers take their time and apply their all into everything they do. The older workers tend to show their loyalty to the organization by demonstrating commitment and sacrifice where the younger ones are usually looking for the next best thing. 2. Employees aged 50 – 65 uses on average about an equal amount of healthcare as those in their 30s and 40s. “The average health care expense in 2002 was $11,089 per year for elderly people but only $3,352 per year for working-age people (ages 19-64)”. “It found that 8 percent of health care expenses occurred during childhood (under age 20), 13 percent during young adulthood (20-39 years), 31 percent during middle age (40-64 years), and nearly half (49 percent) occurred after 65 years of age. Among people age 65 and older, three-quarters of expenses (or 37 percent of the lifetime total) occurred among individuals 65-84 and the rest (12 percent of the lifetime total) among people 85 and over. The total per capita lifetime expense was calculated to be $316,600” . Older People Are Much More Likely To Be Among the Top-spending Percentiles The elderly (age 65 and over) made up around 13 percent of the U.S. population in 2002, but they consumed 36 percent of total U.S. personal health care expenses. The average health care expense in 2002 was $11,089 per year for elderly people but only $3,352 per year for working-age people (ages 19-64).5 Similar differences among age groups are reflected in the data on the top 5 percent of health care spenders. People 65-79 (9 percent of the total population) represented 29 percent of the top 5 percent of spenders. Similarly, people 80 years and older (about 3 percent of the population) accounted for 14 percent of the top 5 percent of spenders (Chart 2, 40 KB).2 However, within age groups, spending is less concentrated among those age 65 and over than for the under-65 population. The top 5 percent of elderly spenders accounted for 34 percent of all expenses by the elderly in 2002, while the top 5
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 03/07/2012.

Page1 / 3

Group Posting - Group Posting(1 10 1 Younger workers tend...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online