Leture 16

Leture 16 - Bio 121 Lecture 16 origins of genetic variation...

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Bio 121 Lecture 16 – origins of genetic variation A. Introduction B. Non-random mating a. Commonly violated assumption of model b. Phenotype often determines who is mated with c. Assortative mating – individuals select mates that are similar c.i. Social, religious, political, or geographical restraints reproductive isolation among human groups d. Tendency for individuals to mate with others who share genes by common decent (inbreeding – mating between relatives) d.i. Population of A = a = 0.5 d.ii. AA = 0.25, Aa = 0.5, aa = 0.25 d.iii. Next gen: AA 0.25, aa 0.25 Aa .125 AA, 0.25 Aa, 0.125 aa d.iii.1. AA = 0.375 aa = 0.375 Aa = 0.25 d.iv. No change in allele frequency d.v. Often harmful because it reveals phenotypic affects of recessive alleles (inbreeding depression) C. Mutation a. Almost always present b. Changes in genetic material in dna and they are random and they are at a very low rate (1 mutation per 10000 gametes) c. Each person has about 1 to 2 mutations each
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This note was uploaded on 03/12/2012 for the course BIO 121 taught by Professor Minchella during the Fall '10 term at Purdue.

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Leture 16 - Bio 121 Lecture 16 origins of genetic variation...

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