lec8b - Refresher: how many wine labels approved each year...

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1 The Chemistry of Terroir Gavin Sacks FDSC 4300 Refresher: how many wine labels approved each year in US? The Unofficial 1 st Law of Wine Flavor Chemistry “If two wines served under identical conditions can be distinguished sensorially taste taste, sight, smell, mouthfeel, etc… they must differ in chemical composition” Extending the 1 st Law of Wine Flavor Chemistry “If wines from the same grape variety grown in different regions served under identical conditions can consistently be distinguished by region sensorially taste , sight , smell , mouthfeel , etc… then there is a consistent pattern of chemical differences between the two regions’ wines” In other words, there must be consistent differences in wine chemistry Interpretations of “Terroir” (or, how to start an argument at a wine tasting) “The total natural environment of any viticultural site . . . Soil, Topography, Macroclimate, Mesoclimate, Microclimate” - Oxford Companion to Wine Terroir consists of the site- or region-specific characteristics of consists of the site or region specific characteristics of a wine.” - Jamie Goode, wineanorak.com and “The Science of Wine” describes the relationship between a wine and the specific place that it comes from” - Harold McGee and Daniel Patterson, New York Times, Feb 2 2007 “Somewhereness” - Matt Kramer, columnist for Wine Spectator Terroir : The bureaucratic definition “A terroir is a unique and delimited geographic area for which there is a collective knowledge of the interaction between the physical and biological environment and applied viticultural practices” A more cynical interpretation: The value of the wine is locked to the place, no chance for outsourcing At right: Map of delimited geographic areas in Burgundy (AOC regions)
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2 The expected outcome of terroir : Wines from similar places taste similar, wines from different places taste different Three sites where Riesling grapes are grown Keuka Lake, NY State (top left) Mosel, Germany (bottom left) Alsace, France (top right) A critical source of contention Does terroir refer to aroma/taste compounds taken up by the grape from the soil? Does it refer specifically to minerals taken from the soil Does it refer, specifically, to minerals taken from the soil? Does it refer only to those unique chemical properties of the final wines caused by the environment? Or does it refer to a more general “sense of place”, i.e. a regional style, regardless of the cause?
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lec8b - Refresher: how many wine labels approved each year...

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