m16l40 - Module 16 Earthquake Resistant Design of...

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Module 16 Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures Version 2 CE IIT, Kharagpur
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Lesson 40 Ductile Design and Detailing of Earthquake Resistant Structures Version 2 CE IIT, Kharagpur
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Instructional Objectives: At the end of this lesson, the student should be able to: define and explain ductility factor with respect to displacement, curvature or rotation, state the advantages of ductility in the design of reinforced concrete members, derive expressions of ductility factor of singly and doubly-reinforced rectangular beams, mention the factors influencing ductility, give general specification of materials for the ductile design of reinforced concrete members, state the general guidelines in the design and detailing of structures having sufficient strength and ductility, identify the situation when special confining reinforcement is needed, to determine the ductility factor of singly and doubly-reinforced rectangular beams applying the expressions, to apply the knowledge in designing and detailing beams, columns and beam-column joints as per IS 13920:1993. 16.40.1 Introduction As mentioned in sec. 16.39.10 of Lesson 39, it is uneconomical to design structures to withstand major earthquakes. However, the design should be done so that the structures have sufficient strength and ductility. This lesson explains the requirements and advantages of ductility in the design of reinforced concrete members which can be expressed with respect to displacement, curvature or rotation of the member. The expressions of ductility of singly and doubly- reinforced beams with respect to curvature are derived. The influencing parameters of the ductility are explained. Several aspects of design for ductility are explained mentioning detailing for ductility, as stipulated in IS 13920:1993, for Version 2 CE IIT, Kharagpur
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flexural members and columns. Illustrative examples are solved to determine the ductility with respect to curvature of singly and doubly-reinforced beams. Moreover, numerical problems are solved to illustrate the design of beams, columns and beam-column joints. 16.40.2 Displacement Ductility Version 2 CE IIT, Kharagpur
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It is essential that an earthquake resistant structure should be capable of deforming in a ductile manner when subjected to lateral loads in several cycles in Version 2 CE IIT, Kharagpur
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the inelastic range. Let us take a single degree of freedom oscillator, as shown in Fig. 16.40.1. In the elastic response, the oscillator has the maximum response at a. The area oab represents the potential energy stored when maximum deflection occurs. The energy is converted into kinetic energy when the mass returns to zero position. Figure 16.40.2 shows the oscillator forming a plastic hinge at a much lower response c when the deflection response continues along cd, d being the maximum response. The potential energy at the maximum response is now represented by the area ocde. When the mass returns to zero position, the part of the potential energy converted to kinetic energy is
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2012 for the course CENG 3012 taught by Professor Prof.j.n.bandopadhyay during the Summer '01 term at Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur.

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m16l40 - Module 16 Earthquake Resistant Design of...

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