international business law

international business law - CLASS 15: INTERNATIONAL...

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CLASS 15: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW
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1.What is International Law? 2.Conflict of Law Principles 3.Methods of Conducting International Business 4.Clauses in International Contracts 5.Regulation: International Controls 6.Regulation: Host Country Regulations 7.Import Controls 8.Export Controls 9.Antitrust Law and International Law 10.Foreign Corrupt Practices Act 11.Alien Tort Statute 12.Review Questions Chapter 12 2 CLASS 15: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW
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International Law? What is it? International law is defined as the “body of rules and regulations, usually in the form of treaties and conventions, regulating relationships between nations.” It is a law of consent – binding on only those who agree to be bound. International Business Entity: Any business entity with relationships that transcend national boundaries. Home Country Regulation: Refers to the laws of the country where the IBE has its principal place of business or is incorporated. Host Country Regulation: The legal system and laws of the foreign jurisdiction. Regional Regulation: The laws of groups of nations that have banded together for a particular purpose. International Regulation: Includes public international law, such as the various codes of conduct for multinational enterprises, as well as private international law, including the Convention on the International Sale of Goods. Chapter 12 3 WHAT IS INTERNATIONAL LAW?
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General Rules: Rule: Parties to a contract can specify in the contract that the law of a particular country will apply to a dispute arising from the contract (choice of law clause). Rule: If there is no choice of law clause in a contract, then the court will apply its own country’s conflict of laws principles in deciding which law will apply. Rule: Judgments of U.S. courts are generally not enforceable in the courts of another country. However, foreign country judgments are generally enforceable in the United States unless there are strong public policy reasons against enforcement. Rule: Foreign nations are typically immune from the jurisdiction of the U.S. courts (sovereign immunity), unless an exception applies (Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act). The most common exceptions are the torts exception and state sponsor of terrorism exception. Chapter 12 4 CONFLICT OF LAW PRINCIPLES
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Information/Liaison Office: Setting up an office in a foreign country for the sole purpose of conveying information or answering questions – it does not provide any services or sell any goods. Import/Export: Transactions of goods/products across international boundaries. Distributorship: Sale of goods to an individual or sales organization that, in turn, resells the product in the foreign country. Governed typically by a distributorship agreement. Sales Representative:
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2012 for the course BUL 3310 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '12 term at Florida State College.

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international business law - CLASS 15: INTERNATIONAL...

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