ocs chapter 5

Ocs chapter 5 - Erin Riche OCS Chapter 5 HW 891013907 6 Why are the freezing and boiling points of water higher than would be expected for a

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Erin Riche OCS Chapter 5 HW 891013907 6. Why are the freezing and boiling points of water higher than would be expected for a compound of its molecular makeup? The freezing and boiling points of water are higher because first off, the basic components of water is made up of two hydrogen atoms that are chemically bonded to one oxygen atom- which makes up the chemical symbol known as H2O. The oxygen bond is bigger than the two hydrogen bonds which makes them have a covalent bond, therefore it is hard to break them up due to the amount of energy (based on their bonds) contains. Thus, the freezing and boiling points of water are high due to the fact that water comes in the states of solid, liquid and gases. That being said, the melting, freezing and boiling points makes up the properties of the three different properties of water, causing them to turn into each different state. If the states were higher than we would only have gaseous states of water on Earth and not have liquid or solid which in turn are made from the freezing and boiling points. We could not continue to life on Earth without the properties of water. 7. How does the specific heat capacity of water compare with that of other substances?
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2012 for the course OCS 1005 taught by Professor Condrey during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Ocs chapter 5 - Erin Riche OCS Chapter 5 HW 891013907 6 Why are the freezing and boiling points of water higher than would be expected for a

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