51938560-Chapter-2-Trans-Plantations-amp-Borderlands

51938560-Chapter-2-T - Bauserman Willmore 1 David Willmore AP US Period 05 20 September 2010 The English Transplantations and Borderlands Chapter

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David Willmore AP US - Period 05 20 September 2010 The English Transplantations and Borderlands Chapter Two Chapter Summary: During the seventeenth century, many separate colonies were established in British North America. Before 1660 most of these colonies were private ventures chartered by the crown. These colonies were peopled largely by English Europeans, many of whom migrated across the Atlantic Ocean in search of greater opportunity, be it economic, religious, or social. After 1660, what were called proprietary colonies became the norm. Charters granted by the crown indicated a closer tie between the “owners” of the colony and the reigning monarch. By the 1680s, England had established an unbroken string of colonies stretching from Canada to the Savannah River and extending into the West Indies. Colonial expansion intensified the contact and conflict with natives. Despite a considerable and mutual exchange of information and goods, the colonists’ ceaseless desire for land led to a deterioration in relations with natives. Gradually, time and distance influenced the attitudes of colonists who began to perceive themselves as a hybrid breed of both Old World English and New World Americans. As the colonies matured, the inhabitants began to exhibit a desire to control their own local affairs and interests that eventually would come to trouble the British Empire. It would also contribute to decisions by officials in London to tighten control over their increasingly independent-minded, not to mention increasingly valuable, possessions in the New World. Points for Discussion: 1. How did the evolution of the Virginia colony between 1607 and 1625 reveal the impact of New World conditions on English aims and expectations? How did the Virginia colonists adapt to American circumstances, and what sort of society emerged as a result? 2. What do the causes of Bacon's Rebellion suggest about the sociopolitical system of Virginia in the 1670s? Why was Bacon considered a hero by some and a traitor by others? What impact did the outcome of the "rebellion" have on Virginia politics? 3. How did the goals of the colonists settling in Massachusetts Bay differ from those of the Virginia colonists? How and why did these goals change in the first fifty years of the colony? How did opponents of these changes respond? 4. How did England apply the principles of mercantilism to its North American and West Indian colonies, and how did the various colonial interests respond? What part did Spain’s American colonies play in English efforts? 5. By 1660, it was evident that England had become concerned about Massachusetts' lack of cooperation with the mother country’s policies. Why did England view Massachusetts as a "troublemaker" (if not an outright enemy), and why, in turn, did the people of the Massachusetts Bay Colony have the same opinion of England? 6.
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2012 for the course HIS 111 taught by Professor Hen during the Spring '12 term at Holyoke CC.

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51938560-Chapter-2-T - Bauserman Willmore 1 David Willmore AP US Period 05 20 September 2010 The English Transplantations and Borderlands Chapter

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