EDUC6650 Week 4 Discussion 1.docx - Focus Chapter 8 Case...

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Focus: Chapter 8, Case Study 8.4: Behavior Management Missing the Mark Biases/Inequalities: For this week’s discussion, I chose a case that focuses on a schools new behavior management system implemented by school administration that would ideally begin to curb school wide behavior issues (Gorski & Pothini, 2018). However, since implementation, school staff have found problems in the plan. Staff have been struggling with how to handle the negative behavior and discipline of some students, and as a result, are hesitant to send students out of class for fear of over-reporting, but are also unsure of how to handle the significant behaviors they are seeing in class (Gorski & Pothini, 2018). In particular, a teacher, Mr. Rhett expresses his concern for the new system in regards to the behavior of two of his (special education) students, and their lack of motivation. Mr. Paulson, a colleague known for his ability to resolve minor concerns in the classroom, offered to speak with the students personally (Gorski & Pothini, 2018). Upon having this discussion, it was clear that one of the bigger issues present is bullying in the classroom amongst students. Various Perspectives: The case study expresses that the entire staff are frustrated with the new behavior management system. This could be due to reasons such as administration tracking the number of referrals, which is causing the teachers to hesitate to call for intervention. As a result, the staff are feeling frustrated and resentful, and could also be feeling unsupported by their administration team. Mr. Rhett, the classroom teacher, appears to be feeling defeated sharing that his students Carson and Andre take their teasing to the next level. He shares he is aware that both students receive special education services, which makes him even more hesitant to send them to the office (Gorski & Pothini, 2018). At this point, he chose to offer them incentives to improve their behavior, but the boys appeared to uninterested in earning rewards and continued to be disruptive.

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