background-call6_en

background-call6_en - Digital Libraries & Digital...

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1 of 20 Digital Libraries & Digital Preservation ICT Work Programme 2009-2010 Call 6 Background Notes October 2009 Disclaimer This document provides background information meant to facilitate the understanding of Objective 4.1 “Digital Libraries and Digital Preservation” in the ICT Work Programme 2009- 2010 1 . Please note that all examples mentioned are purely intended as illustrations. They don't express a specific preference for any domain of research and development, nor do they imply that proposals in domains that are not discussed are discouraged, provided they adhere to the work programme. In any event, the only authoritative source is the text of the work programme. 1 ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/fp7/ict/docs/ict-wp-2009-10_en.pdf
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2 of 20 Table of Contents 1. Introduction______________________________________________________________ 3 2. ICT Work Programme 2009-2010 and research priorities in digital libraries, digital preservation and cultural heritage _______________________________________________ 6 3. Specific target outcomes in the ICT Work Programme 2009-2010 ___________________ 8 a) Scalable systems and services for preserving digital content _______________________ 8 b) Advanced preservation scenarios _____________________________________________ 10 c) Innovative solutions for assembling multimedia digital libraries ____________________ 8 d) Adaptive cultural experiences ________________________________________________ 16 e) Interdisciplinary research networks (Networks of Excellence - NoE) _______________ 18 f) Promoting the uptake of EC-funded research (Coordination and support actions - CSA)20
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3 of 20 1. Introduction Our cultural collections – traditionally held in libraries, museums and archives – are key to the way society has organised its knowledge so that published scientific discoveries, the historical records of how our public and private institutions work, and the output of individual creativity and endeavour are kept and are accessible to citizens. New knowledge is generated on the foundations of the knowledge of the past. The methods both of acquiring and of keeping knowledge are under threat in the digital age. Yet at the same time, ICTs offer new opportunities for working with cultural heritage through digital surrogates that make objects that are physically remote, fragile or inaccessible newly accessible for academic research and for new types of cultural experiences and allow users to re-integrate fragmented collections. Improving access to cultural and scientific knowledge and guaranteeing its availability in a future where technologies rapidly become obsolete is a key challenge for a world where knowledge is an economic driver and which is increasingly driven and dominated by digital content. There are a number of risks: losing content and assets that are in obsolete or fragile formats, and of no longer being able to provide access to them as more content is born-digital, in a time when the technology renewal cycle is ever
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background-call6_en - Digital Libraries & Digital...

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