Ikenberry’s ‘After Victory’

Ikenberry’s ‘After Victory’

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ikenberry’s ‘After Victory’ Ikenberry’s book examines the period in history after the Allied powers victorious triumph over Nazi Germany in 1945. What would the world order be after victory? o Ikenberry argues that once a state wins a war, they are met with three choices: to dominate their enemies, abandon the losers, or transform the international system. o In the case of the United States, they transformed the international system by employing institutions as a way to establish political control and order (Ikenberry 2001: 5-6). Bretton Woods institutions, the United Nations and NATO. Once institutionalized, states – particularly the industrial democracies -- commit and link to one another to create a post-war order that is durable and stable (Ikenberry 2001: 6). As Ikenberry suggested: “…[I]nstitutions are…critical at the beginning of hegemony – or ‘after victory’ – in establishing order and securing cooperation between unequal states” (Ikenberry 2001: 17).\ the United States neither dominated nor abandoned Europe after the war. o
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/15/2012 for the course POLI SCI 103 taught by Professor Pevehouse during the Fall '08 term at Wisconsin.

Page1 / 3

Ikenberry’s ‘After Victory’

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online