The Ring of Fire

The Ring of Fire - The Ring of Fire If you plot on a map of...

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Unformatted text preview: The Ring of Fire If you plot, on a map of the world, the regions of highest volcanic activity and frequent seismic events, you will see that they describe arcs, typically where spreading sea-floor meets plate margins. These are the regions where there are subduction zones and the consequent increased vulcanism noted above. This explains why, for example, there are so many earthquakes and volcanoes along the Aleutian archipelago, in Japan, and down through Indonesia. The deep subduction zones are also the sites of the extraordinarily deep ocean trenches, such as the Marianas Trench near the Philipines. The ocean there is deeper than Mt Everest is tall, and it is a remarkable testament to human courage that people have descended to the bottom of the sea here, in a thickly-walled steel bathyscaphe little bigger than a Volkswagen -- under the astounding pressure of seven miles of water...
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This note was uploaded on 03/09/2012 for the course AST 1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Spring '10 term at Broward College.

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The Ring of Fire - The Ring of Fire If you plot on a map of...

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