Module 5

Module 5 - History of Rock Music - Lecture 5 - British...

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History of Rock Music - Lecture 5 - British Invasion-Part 2 The British Invasion Part 2 - The Rolling Stones The best rock and roll encapsulates a certain high energy-an angriness-whether on record or on stage. That is, rock and roll is only rock and roll if it's not safe. Mick Jagger, 1988, quoted in Rolling Stone 1.“It’s Only Rock and Roll (But I Like It)” THE ROLLING STONES
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(l-r: Bill Wyman, Mick Jagger, Brian Jones, Charlie Watts, Keith Richards) Along with the Beatles, there were a number of British bands poised on the cutting edge of mid-sixties rock and roll. These contemporaries were led by the Rolling Stones. In February 1963, as the Fab Four were making their way to the top of the British charts, the Rolling Stones were starting their first regular Sunday appearances in the backroom of a London pub. The band, named after the Muddy Waters blues tune "Rollin' Stone,” capitalized on aggressive, unpolished versions of predominantly Black American music to propel it to the forefront of the fledgling British blues movement. By the middle of the decade the Rolling Stones had achieved commercial success on both sides of the Atlantic. When the Beatles self-destructed, the Stones emerged from the shadows to create their own brief golden age. The Rolling Stones were four young London suburbanites (singer Mick Jagger, guitarist Keith Richards, bassist Bill Wyman, and drummer Charlie Watts) and one well-off provincial (guitarist Brian Jones) who went beyond the classic rock music of their youth to discover and follow its blues and R&B antecedents.
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Mick Jagger (b. 1943) grew up in a household of moderate means in suburban London: "My mum is very working class, my father bourgeois, because he had a reasonable good education, so I came from somewhere in between that." His father, Joe, was a physical education teacher and his mother was sure Mick would become a politician, especially after the young Jagger enrolled in the prestigious London School of Economics (LSE) to study accounting. Indicative of his cautious nature, Mick didn't quit LSE until he was sure that the Rolling Stones had become a commercially viable group. Jagger's musical history included the stereotypical introduction to American rock and roll via the classic rockers. Labeled "jungle music" by his father, Mick was crazy about Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, Bo Diddley, and to a lesser extent Buddy Holly. From there he followed a musical progression back in time, discovering bluesmen Big Bill Broonzy (who toured England before his death in 1958) and Muddy Waters. These roots took hold of young Jagger, who had already demonstrated a propensity toward show business pursuits, appearing as a model on his father's physical-fitness TV show.
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Keith Richards (b. 1943) played with Mick in the same Dartford primary school playground until the age of six or seven, when the Richards family moved to a housing development on the rougher side of the tracks. Keith was sufficiently talented as a boy soprano to appear at Westminster Abbey and Royal Albert
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Module 5 - History of Rock Music - Lecture 5 - British...

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