Module 12

Module 12 - History of Rock Music - Lecture 12 LECTURE 12...

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History of Rock Music - Lecture 12 LECTURE 12 1980s - Part 2
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1. Queen at Live Aid 1985 Song lyrics During the eighties popular music increased its dialogue around issues of political, economic, and social justice. In fact, artists and concert promoters chose to link those causes with major concert events in order to publicize issues, raise funds, involve more artists, and help promote the business of rock music. These "mega-events" (Live Aid, Farm Aid, and the Amnesty International human rights tours were the biggest) hoped to redirect some focus from sex, drugs, and rock and roll toward a discussion of social responsibility. Scholars disagree on the cumulative impact of these and other events. Some felt that they served to co-opt the oppositional intentions of the artist and audience for industry gain while providing a social safety valve to fans wishing to express dissatisfaction. Others, like Dave Marsh, believe that it enhanced "the reawakening of a section of the rock audience to its own social potential and a quantum leap in the public awareness of the horrifying problems of poverty, hunger, homelessness and racism" The Concert for Bangladesh 1971 l-r: Billy Preston, Klaus Voorman, Jesse Ed Davis, Ringo Starr, George Harrison, Jim Keltner, Eric Clapton , Leon Russell. 2. “ Bangladesh ” Song lyrics The mega-events of the 1980s reflected the structure and format of the golden era concerts; the Monterey Pop Festival, Woodstock , and Watkins Glen. The Concert for Bangladesh , organized in 1971 by former Beatle George Harrison at New York 's Madison Square Garden , was a prototype that raised nearly $250,000 with performances by Ringo Starr, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, Leon Russell, and other friends. In the late 1970s anti-Nazi and antiracist groups in England staged a series of concerts called Rock Against Racism featuring the Clash, Elvis Costello, X-Ray Spex, and Steel Pulse. Live Aid
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Bob Geldof Live Aid, an event organized by Boomtown Rats frontman Bob Geldoff, raised $67 million for starving Africans. On July 13, 1985, concerts were held simultaneously in London , Philadelphia , and Sydney , linked electronically and broadcast to 1.5 billion people in a hundred countries. Entertainers included Paul McCartney, the Who, and David Bowie at England's Wembley Stadium and Eric Clapton, Mick Jagger, Tina Turner, Madonna, and the Led Zeppelin survivors at Philadelphia's Veteran's Stadium. Phil Collins hopped a supersonic Concorde and played both shows. Live Aid was a catalyst, and it was closely followed by Farm Aid in September 1985, an effort by Willie Nelson and John (Cougar) Mellencamp to publicize the plight of the family farm. In October 1985 Artists United Against Apartheid (AUAA) released the album Sun City , organized by "Little Steven" Van Zandt, Bruce Springsteen's former guitarist. AUAA members Springsteen, Peter Gabriel, Bob Dylan, Bonnie Raitt, Miles Davis, and others challenged all musicians to confront the political system in South Africa and also
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2012 for the course MUH 2022 taught by Professor Dr.tranquilino during the Fall '11 term at FIU.

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Module 12 - History of Rock Music - Lecture 12 LECTURE 12...

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