Punctuation - COMMAS, COLONS, AND SEMICOLONS Commas Use...

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COMMAS, COLONS, AND SEMICOLONS Commas Use after introductory material word, independent clause Nevertheless, we agreed upon the same route. phrase, independent clause For most of us, his idea was agreeable. dependent clause, independent clause If she wants to attend, she’ll have to arrive early. Use to separate two sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction (and, but, or, nor, so, yet) June is a good time to go swimming, and February is a good month to ski. Wrong: I like attending theater, and watching football games. Use to set off parenthetical material (dashes and parentheses can also be used) She removed everything from her room, including her furniture, before she found her ring. Use to separate items in a series She bought a pound of flour, sugar, and wheat at the store yesterday.
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Colon Use at end of sentence to emphasize what comes next sentence: word There’s one thing I can’t stand about the summer: humidity.
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Punctuation - COMMAS, COLONS, AND SEMICOLONS Commas Use...

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