Week 4 DQ 1 Answer - person prays over their food prior to...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What is the connection between habit and moral character? Do you think a bad habit is indicative of bad moral character, or are habits, by definition, more objective in their scope? I do not think that there is any real connection between ones habit and moral character. The reason being is because habit is behavior that is obtained through a pattern of repetitiveness. This is something that has been done over and over on a consistent basis until; it becomes a habit that is done involuntarily conscious/unconsciously knowing. Whereas, moral character is the distinguished qualities in a person in which helps define who they are, their thoughts and beliefs. In this world there are good habits and there are bad habits. For instance, a good habit would be to bless your food before each meal; while a bad habit would be having an addiction to drugs. Does that mean that just because a
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: person prays over their food prior to eating that they have good moral characteristics? Or, does it mean that due to a person becoming and being addicted to drugs that they have bad moral character? With these questions in mind I do not think that the two can be connected in any way. I believe that it is very much so possible for an individual to have good moral and bad habits and vice versa. Is it possible to connect habits to moral character when habits are a continuous act of our subconscious? I would say that ones moral character can be linked to a person conscious decisions, thoughts, and beliefs. I think that the importance of having good characteristics and maintaining a good moral character is to know and be well aware of the difference between wrong and right....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/12/2012 for the course PSY 201 201 taught by Professor Peters during the Winter '11 term at University of Phoenix.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online