Class22 - Does a single particle have a temperature? 1. 2....

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2/27/12 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 22 1 Does a single particle have a temperature? 1. Always. 2. Never. 3. Sometimes (when it has a fever).
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2/27/12 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 22 2 The Average Kinetic Energy of a Single Particle in an Ideal Gas With many particles bouncing around in the gas, the kinetic energy of any given particle changes many times per second (since its speed changes that often). We understand the overall (macroscopic) effect of all the changes via the average kinetic energy of a single particle. First, we recognize that the kinetic energy (K) of any body may have three different parts: Translational ( K T ) Rotational ( K R ) Vibrational ( K V ) But if we use only monatomic ideal gas particles, their K R and K V are negligible; we need only the average translational kinetic energy , K T.avg , of a single particle: K T.avg = [(1/2) m particle v 2 ] avg
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2/27/12 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 22 3 For any gas, we know m particle is a constant. But how do we get an average for v 2 ? Couldn’t we just find the average speed somehow, then square it? No. Consider any two identical gas particles, A and B, that have different
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2012 for the course PH 202 taught by Professor Staff during the Winter '08 term at Oregon State.

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Class22 - Does a single particle have a temperature? 1. 2....

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