Class10 - Review: How much louder to your ears (i.e. in...

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1/30/12 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 10 1 Review : How much louder to your ears (i.e. in your own experience) is a 73-dB sound than a 43-dB sound? 1. 3 times as loud 2. 6 times as loud 3. 8 times as loud 4. 30 times as loud 5. None of the above .
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1/30/12 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 10 2 The Doppler Effect When a sound source “strikes” the air, it dispatches a disturbance that then travels through that air with a speed characteristic of the air (temperature, pressure, etc.) The speed of the source does not affect the speed of the wave. But it does affect the sound’s wavelength—the distance that you, as an observer, see between its successive peaks. But v = f λ . And since the speed, v , is the same but the observed wavelength, λ o , changes, the observed frequency f o , must change, too: f o = v / λ o Notice that we’re always assuming that the air is at rest—no breeze).
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1/30/12 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 10 3 Examples : A train whistle has a frequency of 400 Hz. Assuming the
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Class10 - Review: How much louder to your ears (i.e. in...

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