Lecture 22 - Electrons in Atoms and Periodic Properties Part 2

Lecture 22 - Electrons in Atoms and Periodic Properties Part 2

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Electrons in Atoms and periodic properties Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Fall 2011 1 Lec-22: Light, Spectra, and the Bohr Model of Hydrogen Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Fall 2011 2 Oct 21, 2011
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Modern periodic table Period Group Transition elements The properties of the elements are related to their electronic configuration Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Fall 2011 3 Atomic Structure The electrons are situated at comparatively large distances (compared to nuclear dimensions) (compared to nuclear dimensions) around the nucleus The fundamental structural blocks of substances are the atoms Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Fall 2011 4
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5 Lungs Brain Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Spring 2011 Atomic Structure Radiation plays an important role in the Radiation plays an important role in the study of atomic structure -> atoms absorb & emit radiation The electromagnetic spectrum is a continuous Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Fall 2011 6 range of radiant energy.
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Waves Waves are crucial for characterizing Electromagnetic radiation A wave can be described as a disturbance that travels through a medium from one location to another location. Electromagnetic radiation Here Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Fall 2011 7 Waves Longitudinal Wave Water Wave Transverse Wave Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Fall 2011 8 A wave is a transfer of energy over a distance.
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Waves Nontrivial amounts of energy can Nontrivial amounts of energy can be transported by waves with devastating effects f=10m in – 2h Shoaling f = 10 min – 2hr ˣ ~ 500 km v ~ ¥ (g*d) When waves enter shallow water they slow down. The energy flux must remain constant and the reduction in group (transport) speed is compensated by an increase Roy A. Lacey, Stony Brook University; Che 131, Fall 2011 9 in wave height (and thus wave energy density).
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This note was uploaded on 03/12/2012 for the course CHEMISTRY 131 taught by Professor Lacey during the Fall '11 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lecture 22 - Electrons in Atoms and Periodic Properties Part 2

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