Week 3 - Assignment 1

Week 3 - Assignment 1 - Electronic Surveillance Of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Electronic Surveillance Of Employees 1 Electronic Surveillance Of Employees By Priya Prasad Law, Ethics, and Corporate Governance – LEG 500 Professor Anne Dewey-Balzhiser
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Electronic Surveillance Of Employees 2 Executive Summary This paper will explore where an employee can expect reasonable amount of privacy in a workplace environment based on the review of a video in which an employer listens to the conversation his employee has with a customer. An emerging increase in the use of technology in the workplace has created new concerns for employers and employees that is currently unsettled. This paper provides an overview on a highly debated area of a person’s right to privacy within the workplace and an employer’s right monitor employee practices to increase the productivity and efficiency of its business. The paper will also discuss the difference in the expectations of an employee’s privacy in a workplace environment that is open or closed, to what extent should an employer engage in electronic surveillance, and a small explanation of to what extent the inclusion of innocent, unaware third-parties in such surveillance is legal.
Background image of page 2
3 Explain where an employee can reasonably expect to have privacy in the workplace. Generally an employee can reasonably expect to have privacy in a bathroom or locker rooms, places consider physically invasive. However, there have been cases where courts have sided with employers for having cameras in bathroom and locker rooms also, excluding specifically within bathroom stalls. This could be challenged by tort law under the premise of intrusion and if it would seem offensive to a reasonable person. Beyond those two areas most employees have little rights to privacy within the workplace. New technology has made it possible for employers to monitor many aspects of their employees’ jobs, such as telephones, computers, voicemails, and internet monitoring. Video monitoring is commonplace in many work environments to maintain security, monitor employees, and to deter theft. As stated in an article by David Amar and Brownstein (n.d.,): Because employers compensate employees to perform their jobs, courts traditionally have granted employers a wide latitude to monitor their employees' work performance and productivity provided that such monitoring does not violate an employee's reasonable expectation of privacy. Courts usually act deferentially even when employers engage in electronic surveillance, such as by monitoring phone lines, e-mail accounts and Internet access, when the employer has disclosed its monitoring policy to its employees, thereby diminishing any reasonable expectation of privacy in those areas.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/11/2012 for the course LEG500 LEG500 taught by Professor Prof.dean during the Spring '11 term at Strayer.

Page1 / 8

Week 3 - Assignment 1 - Electronic Surveillance Of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online